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The New York City home of @apparatusstudio founders Gabriel Hendifar and @jeremy_r_anderson ...
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The New York City home of @apparatusstudio founders Gabriel Hendifar and @jeremy_r_anderson feels very much like one of the company’s signature lighting designs. They share a strange kind of beauty, highly refined and seriously seductive. At a time of increasing sameness, when designers ... The New York City home of @apparatusstudio founders Gabriel Hendifar and @jeremy_r_anderson feels very much like one of the company’s signature lighting designs. They share a strange kind of beauty, highly refined and seriously seductive. At a time of increasing sameness, when designers across the globe draw from a communal digital well of inspirations and influences, the Apparatus aesthetic remains blissfully, unapologetically idiosyncratic. “Many of our product designs and collections evolved directly from pieces we made for ourselves. As much as this loft functions as a creative laboratory, it’s also our home. We set a high bar for the things we live with and the things we put out into the world,” says Hendifar, who serves as Apparatus’s creative director. “Besides, we always need a project to chew on to keep the creative juices flowing.” The look of the couple’s master bedroom can be summed up in two words: come-hither. Sheathed in rust-colored velvet and centered on a brass bed with a Persian lamb bolster set into the headboard, the space echoes the crazy-sexy-cool vibe of disco-era debauchery. Even the mirror-fronted closets and the meshugenah Vladimir Kagan Omnibus lounge in the adjacent dressing room have an undercurrent of 1970s louche. As a final flourish, a small painting of Anderson’s ear that Hendifar commissioned for his partner’s 40th birthday hangs above the bed. “It was the perfectly right wrong thing to put there,” Hendifar avers. Take a tour of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @francoisdischinger; text by @mayer.rus; styled by @michaelreynoldsnyc
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"The magazine is just the shop window,” explains Italian tastemaker @martinamondadori Sartogo ...
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"The magazine is just the shop window,” explains Italian tastemaker @martinamondadori Sartogo of @cabanamagazine, the dreamy, clothbound interiors magazine she launched in 2014. “The real goal has always been to create products for the home that give you the same feeling of flipping ... "The magazine is just the shop window,” explains Italian tastemaker @martinamondadori Sartogo of @cabanamagazine, the dreamy, clothbound interiors magazine she launched in 2014. “The real goal has always been to create products for the home that give you the same feeling of flipping through the pages.” A mere four years later and she’s done just that, spinning Cabana’s colorful, mix-and-match ethos into a full-on lifestyle brand that has included tableware collaborations with Italian favorites such as Richard Ginori, Laboratorio Paravicini, and Laguna B. And what Mondadori Sartogo fondly calls her “big Cabana family” just keeps growing, as she brings some kindred spirits into the fold this fall. “I have been friends with Martina—and a big fan of Cabana—for many years,” says Aerin Lauder, founder and creative director of @aerin. Having spent her teenage years in Vienna, Lauder notes that Cabana’s Austrian-themed fall issue, inspired by a trip to the Tyrolean Folk Art Museum, proved “the perfect time to collaborate.” Together they realized Viennese style for the table, asking artisans to hand-paint glassware with the folkloric motifs and to turn textiles used for traditional dress aprons into prim table linens; a vibrant collection that would seamlessly fit into Mondadori Sartogo’s London home, pictured here. Visit the link in our profile to discover the pieces. Photo by @miguelfloresvianna; text by @_h_mart_
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When you’re in the business of producing movies, television, and theater, you understand the importance ...
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When you’re in the business of producing movies, television, and theater, you understand the importance of establishing the right mise-en-scène. Just ask #JakeGyllenhaal and Riva Marker, founding partners of the New York City–based production company Nine Stories. Established in ... When you’re in the business of producing movies, television, and theater, you understand the importance of establishing the right mise-en-scène. Just ask #JakeGyllenhaal and Riva Marker, founding partners of the New York City–based production company Nine Stories. Established in 2015 and named after J. D. Salinger’s 1953 anthology of short fiction, Nine Stories specializes in what Marker describes as “provocative, character-driven material that emphasizes both quality and commercial appeal.” The company’s offices are located in a SoHo apartment that was recently transformed by the #AD100 firm @ashe_leandro. “We wanted to have a sense of play in the design. It’s a place where filmmakers and artists can feel empowered to be open, inventive, and collaborative,” Gyllenhaal says. Partners @arielashe and @reilean responded with a design scheme that eschews the trappings of slick Hollywood glamour in favor of something moodier, cozier, and more redolent of Manhattan. The design is a sophisticated mélange of midcentury-modern classics and vintage desks culled from @1stdibs, abundant artwork and movie posters, and bespoke elements such as the dapper wood screen that defines one edge of the communal seating area. Visit the link in our profile to take a closer look at the space. Photo by @susannabanana; text by @mayer.rus; styled by @colinking
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The white winged Oculus is an organic form in the center of a new complex of towers, and memorial pools ...
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The white winged Oculus is an organic form in the center of a new complex of towers, and memorial pools at the sites of the two that fell on September 11, 2001. As expected on such an emotionally charged site, the structure, realized by architect Santiago Calatrava, was not without its own controversy ... The white winged Oculus is an organic form in the center of a new complex of towers, and memorial pools at the sites of the two that fell on September 11, 2001. As expected on such an emotionally charged site, the structure, realized by architect Santiago Calatrava, was not without its own controversy (it came to fruition seven years behind schedule and severely over budget, though much of the problem was due to owner holdups). However, the soaring form with its vast interiors is a standout among a sea of Lower Manhattan rectangles. A project that began just one year after the tragic event and was completed, 14 years later, in February 2016, the Oculus is not only a physical connector for underground trains, but Calatrava intends, “a witness of belief that we can overcome this tragedy,” a symbol of the camaraderie of the American people, and a gift “given to the community.” Each year on #September11th, the Oculus’ central skylight opens to reveal a strip of sky at 10:28 a.m., the same time that the North Tower fell during the attack. Read the entire interview with Calatrava about the Oculus through the link in our profile. Photo from the book “Santiago Calatrava: Oculus” (@assouline) by @alan_karchmer; text by @efazzare #NeverForget
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Despite its far-flung location and sparse population, Northern Norway offers some excellent ...
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Despite its far-flung location and sparse population, Northern Norway offers some excellent travel experiences for design lovers. With noteworthy architectural works spread throughout the region that are inspired by everything from the indigenous Sámi people’s traditionally nomadic ... Despite its far-flung location and sparse population, Northern Norway offers some excellent travel experiences for design lovers. With noteworthy architectural works spread throughout the region that are inspired by everything from the indigenous Sámi people’s traditionally nomadic way of life to centuries-old fishing practices still practiced today, the twisting movements of the Northern Lights and the dark history of Finnmark’s 17th-century witchcraft trials, design in Northern Norway finds endless inspiration in its history and nature. Norway's network of 18 designated National Scenic Routes has both an architecture and art council, which oversee more than 200 installations along the routes. In Northern Norway, those include a rest stop by @snohetta, pictured here, a viewing platform by @codearkitektur, and sleek bird-watching hides by @biotope. Discover the most noteworthy architectural works spread throughout the remote region through the link in our profile. Photo courtesy of @snohetta; text by @karendesuyo
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It took over 4 years to reconfigure this eight-bedroom duplex atop an iconic 1920s Rosario Candela–designed ...
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It took over 4 years to reconfigure this eight-bedroom duplex atop an iconic 1920s Rosario Candela–designed building, which was considered one of Manhattan’s ultimate trophy apartments. The previous owners had combined two apartments in the 1980s, but only in a rudimentary way. “They ... It took over 4 years to reconfigure this eight-bedroom duplex atop an iconic 1920s Rosario Candela–designed building, which was considered one of Manhattan’s ultimate trophy apartments. The previous owners had combined two apartments in the 1980s, but only in a rudimentary way. “They busted a hole in a wall, but the apartments were never properly integrated,” attests one of the new owners—the husband, a financier. The couple tapped #AD100 designer @michaelsmithinc and architect Oscar Shamamian to give the storied residence a new lease on life, which proved no small task. “Oscar and I did a huge victory lap when we figured out how we could fuse the apartments,” says Smith. Once the engineering hurdles were cleared, the most formidable challenge involved integrating the couple’s museum-quality collection of art and antiques, much of which has been displayed in the dozen or so residences that Smith has designed for them over the past quarter-century. “A lot of things have followed them around from house to house. It’s a really personal group of objects,” says Smith. “Some things are super-precious and some things are really simple—picked up in a flea market or a souk in Morocco.” In the antiques-filled living room pictured here, a Josef Albers painting hangs over the Louis XVI mantel. “I love the 18th century, but an apartment done with everything from the 18th century is frozen in aspic,” says the financier. “We like combining that period with modern art and furniture.” Discover more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @themichaelmundy; styling by @carolinairving; text by @jamesnreginato
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In these challenging times, long-term relationships are hard to sustain. Los Angeles–based #AD100 ...
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In these challenging times, long-term relationships are hard to sustain. Los Angeles–based #AD100 designer @michaelsmithinc, renowned for his work at the White House for @barackobama and @michelleobama and for many other A-list clients, has enjoyed a solid one with a certain couple ... In these challenging times, long-term relationships are hard to sustain. Los Angeles–based #AD100 designer @michaelsmithinc, renowned for his work at the White House for @barackobama and @michelleobama and for many other A-list clients, has enjoyed a solid one with a certain couple who have been his clients for 25 years. The apartment that this pair purchased several years ago has been a lengthy undertaking, too. The eight-bedroom duplex, atop an iconic 1920s Rosario Candela–designed building, was considered one of Manhattan’s ultimate trophy apartments. In fact, the residence had a big drawback—it was basically two separate apartments. Its previous owners, a business mogul and his wife, had bought the adjacent units in the late 1980s and combined them, but only in a rudimentary way. “They busted a hole in a wall, but the apartments were never properly integrated,” attests one of the new owners—the husband, a financier. The mogul had been stymied—as were many prospective purchasers after his widow put it on the market—by a seemingly insurmountable obstacle: A grand staircase in the center of the footprint blocked complete consolidation. “The key to the whole thing was taking out that staircase,” says the financier. “But who in New York thinks about taking out a staircase? You have to think outside the box. “Of course, that’s what Michael does, along with [architect] Oscar [Shamamian],” he continues. “They just took the stair out and put another one over there. And, voilà.” See the spectacular update, as featured on the cover of our October issue, through the link in our profile. Photo by @themichaelmundy; styling by @carolinairving; text by @jamesnreginato
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When Ed Cole and Christopher Wigand purchased a storied Palm Springs house dreamed up by Hollywood ...
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When Ed Cole and Christopher Wigand purchased a storied Palm Springs house dreamed up by Hollywood set designer James McNaughton in the early ‘60s, they called on interior designer @anthonycochrandesign and contractor @stokerconstructioninc to help restore the property’s luster, ... When Ed Cole and Christopher Wigand purchased a storied Palm Springs house dreamed up by Hollywood set designer James McNaughton in the early ‘60s, they called on interior designer @anthonycochrandesign and contractor @stokerconstructioninc to help restore the property’s luster, creating a 21st-century interpretation of McNaughton’s vision. “I’m not sure any of us really knew what we were getting into,” says Cochran, half jokingly. “It was a fantastic challenge to make the property feel modern while completely embracing the past.” The designer and his clients were lucky to have archival magazine spreads—including a story published in @archdigest in 1963, showing the home’s early decor and layout. Inside, Cochran was responsible for making sense of Wigand’s and Cole’s vast collection of furniture, which included everything from Italian antiques that once belonged to the Hearst family to a series of bold Lucite-and-metal pieces by American designer Charles Hollis Jones, whose bed is pictured here in a guest room. It all came together splendidly. “I had never worked on a house that had this kind of pedigree, much less tour buses going by on a daily basis,” says the designer. “It was important for me to do something that Palm Springs could be proud of and the owners could be proud of.” Discover the rest of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @lance.gerber; text by @whatpaolasees
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Whether it’s a starchitect or an under-the-radar designer, museums have proved to be a timeless ...
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Whether it’s a starchitect or an under-the-radar designer, museums have proved to be a timeless destination for challenging the boundaries of design. And since one of the roles of any structure is to welcome its visitors, it makes sense that these public venues are stunning designs meant ... Whether it’s a starchitect or an under-the-radar designer, museums have proved to be a timeless destination for challenging the boundaries of design. And since one of the roles of any structure is to welcome its visitors, it makes sense that these public venues are stunning designs meant to entice patrons into its doors. We surveyed the most beautifully designed museum in each U.S. state—keeping in mind that sometimes the most remarkable museums are also ones intended to entertain children. Our pick for Missouri is the @pulitzerarts Foundation in St. Louis, designed by Tadao Ando and completed in 2001. The museum’s boxy structure represents Ando’s first public project in the U.S. and features permanent sculptures by Richard Serra and Ellsworth Kelly. Discover our list of the best museums in every state through the link in our profile. Text by @kristineahansen
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Any space inhabited by Jérôme Faillant-Dumas and Anda Rowland is going to be full of color. @faillantdumas, ...
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Any space inhabited by Jérôme Faillant-Dumas and Anda Rowland is going to be full of color. @faillantdumas, an interior designer who also designs furniture (and works on branding and packaging for global luxury brands) via his company @l.o.v.e.editions, cut his teeth at Chanel before ... Any space inhabited by Jérôme Faillant-Dumas and Anda Rowland is going to be full of color. @faillantdumas, an interior designer who also designs furniture (and works on branding and packaging for global luxury brands) via his company @l.o.v.e.editions, cut his teeth at Chanel before spending 15 years working for Yves Saint Laurent. Rowland manages @andersonandsheppard, her family’s Savile Row tailors, who have been suiting dapper men from Fred Astaire to Prince Charles for more than 100 years. So when the couple swapped a two-bedroom flat in London’s Belgravia for a handsome six-bedroom townhouse a few blocks away in Pimlico, vanilla was not on the table. “Saint Laurent was the king of color,” says Faillant-Dumas. “And, personally, I think it’s very sad to do the white ‘thing’—I’m very lucky because Anda loves color, too.” In the breakfast nook, a mixed-media piece by Harland Miller hangs above a bespoke table, custom-made banquette covered in an @alton_brooke stripe and chairs by Faillant-Dumas for @l.o.v.e.editions. See inside the homethrough the link in our profile. Photo by @simonuptonphotos; text by @alice__bb; styled by @carolinairving
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"What I love is that every room you walk into, you feel like you’re in a completely different house, ...
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"What I love is that every room you walk into, you feel like you’re in a completely different house, but not in a disjointed way," says @asimplefavor director @paulfeig of his eclectic Madison Avenue apartment in New York’s Upper East Side. "Whatever room you walk into, you’re happy to be ... "What I love is that every room you walk into, you feel like you’re in a completely different house, but not in a disjointed way," says @asimplefavor director @paulfeig of his eclectic Madison Avenue apartment in New York’s Upper East Side. "Whatever room you walk into, you’re happy to be in that room." While the majority of rooms in the home are an abundance of color, the bright, mostly white kitchen takes a break from the overall vibrant tone of the apartment, albeit the pink backsplash tile from the Kersie/Colibri Collection and pink chandelier from @capitalltg, which offer pops of color. See more of Feig’s playful residence through the link in our profile. Photo by @kyle_knodell; design by Heidi James of @studiolxiv; text by @julietizon
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To fashion means to construct or fabricate something, and @rogangregory has been busy doing just ...
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To fashion means to construct or fabricate something, and @rogangregory has been busy doing just that. After getting his start designing clothing—first with his denim line Rogan, then with the environmentally focused label Loomstate—the artist has bravely switched paths, devoting ... To fashion means to construct or fabricate something, and @rogangregory has been busy doing just that. After getting his start designing clothing—first with his denim line Rogan, then with the environmentally focused label Loomstate—the artist has bravely switched paths, devoting the past three years to creating tables, lighting, and other striking objects, some as small as a two-inch bronze talon. As it turns out, his experience in the fashion business has eased the transition. “I do functional pieces, but I have the freedom to do pure sculpture too,” says the soft-­spoken and resplendently bearded Gregory, whose latest creations go on view at Manhattan’s @randcompanynyc. gallery this month. Comprising dozens of objects, his exhibition, titled “Known Unknown,” marks the first solo show at R & Co.’s new three-story, 8,000-square-foot space in Tribeca. “The gallery has a lot of dimension,” says Gregory, who will hang some of his lighting pieces within the 40-foot-tall atrium. “That means I can really scale things up.” It’s no surprise that another R & Co. favorite, Wendell Castle—the protean master of the American Studio Furniture movement, who died earlier this year at 85—is a role model for Gregory. At his live/work house in Amagansett, seen here, Gregory manipulates organic materials, from marble to beach sand, with forms that tend toward the biomorphic and the geological, as if they’ve been pulled out of the ground or washed up on the shore.Take a closer look inside the home and collection through the link in our profile. Photo by @maxbphoto_tx; text by @looslips
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Before taking on a two-year restoration of this 19th-century shingled house, designer @jackceglic ...
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Before taking on a two-year restoration of this 19th-century shingled house, designer @jackceglic and architect Manuel Fernandez-Casteleiro, carefully considered its scope. “The challenge was to not make it look like we did too much—we wanted it to look like we didn’t do anything,” ... Before taking on a two-year restoration of this 19th-century shingled house, designer @jackceglic and architect Manuel Fernandez-Casteleiro, carefully considered its scope. “The challenge was to not make it look like we did too much—we wanted it to look like we didn’t do anything,” says Ceglic. Indeed, a visitor to the finished home is, by design, not meant to perceive that an arduous “sculpting” process was involved in the renovation, which comprised removing a number of additions so that all that remained was the 2,000-square-foot, original footprint (and one add-on built in the 1920s). One of the initial requests from the home’s owner, composer and conductor Jonathan Sheffer, was to paint the wainscoting white, to which the duo said “absolutely not—it was the only house in the Hamptons we’d ever seen that hadn’t been painted,” recalls Ceglic. The fir panels lining the interior walls, with their nautical aura and slightly green cast, were meticulously removed and numbered during the renovation, so they could be reinstalled in place after the core was totally rebuilt. “Even though it’s an open plan, all of the rooms are divided into areas, and they are all multi-purpose so they don’t become dead rooms,” says Ceglic. “It’s a house for entertaining, so guests can locate themselves anywhere and there’s a beautiful spot for them,” adds Fernandez-Casteleiro. Discover more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @twilliamsphoto; text by @davidfoxley; styled by @colinking
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The beauty of the Faroe Islands lies in its dramatic hills, unspoiled moorlands, winding fjords, ...
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The beauty of the Faroe Islands lies in its dramatic hills, unspoiled moorlands, winding fjords, and bird-laden cliffs. The natural landscape has remained largely untouched for centuries, and plays a prominent role in defining the archipelago's identity. The Faroese people learned ... The beauty of the Faroe Islands lies in its dramatic hills, unspoiled moorlands, winding fjords, and bird-laden cliffs. The natural landscape has remained largely untouched for centuries, and plays a prominent role in defining the archipelago's identity. The Faroese people learned ages ago how to make the most of their natural resources and the value of respecting the environment, which explains how a newly built town hall in Nordragota on the island of Esturoy ended up looking as though it were chiseled into the landscape. Designed by Ósbjørn Jacobsen, a partner at the Danish architecture firm @henninglarsenarchitects, the Eysturkommuna town hall is built atop a river with a greenery-filled rooftop that doubles as a pedestrian bridge. Viewers from a distance may find it hard to settle their eye on the structure, as it blends seamlessly into the landscape, almost as though it were surgically inserted beneath a thin layer of grass. "A central theme in traditional Faroese architecture is the blurred line between nature and building, the fact that the spectator has difficulties distinguishing where the landscape ends and the building begins," explains Jacobsen. Take a closer look at the structure through the link in our profile. Photo by @nic.lehoux; text by @katiemmcgrath
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At first, it can be difficult to tell the difference between @erinwasson’s sunlit California living ...
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At first, it can be difficult to tell the difference between @erinwasson’s sunlit California living room and a finely curated gallery space. Wasson, of course, is one of the world’s most celebrated supermodels, having appeared in ad campaigns for the likes of @gucci, @chanelofficial, ... At first, it can be difficult to tell the difference between @erinwasson’s sunlit California living room and a finely curated gallery space. Wasson, of course, is one of the world’s most celebrated supermodels, having appeared in ad campaigns for the likes of @gucci, @chanelofficial, and @dolcegabbana. But even a cursory glance around her Malibu home reveals that she could have had a robust second career as an interior decorator; she has an incredible eye for design. The aesthetic is anything but contrived: At age 17, Wasson lived above an art gallery in Dallas, where she met many artists who would become lifelong friends. “It was kind of an urban commune situation,” she recalls. “It was this compressed moment where there were all these extraordinary talents living in Dallas at the same time.” One of her neighbors from that period was figurative sculptor Erick Swenson; now his monkey head piece sits dramatically on a column in Wasson’s sitting room. A common thread throughout Wasson’s career has been collaborating with friends, and the design of her home in Malibu was no exception. She worked hand in hand with her business partner and collaborator, interior designer @joshevaninteriors, to reinvent her aesthetic for her new house. “We’ve been putting spaces together since we were teenagers in Texas,” Evan says. In a hallway, Wasson used a sculpture she found at @gypsylandpalmsprings (and painted pink!) as a console base. See the rest of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @christopherpatey; text by @julietizon; styled by @paigecwassel
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It’s quite possible that @paulfeig’s Madison Avenue apartment is the most colorful apartment ...
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It’s quite possible that @paulfeig’s Madison Avenue apartment is the most colorful apartment in all of the Upper East Side. Clocking in at under 1,000 square feet, the one-bedroom, one-and-a-half bath may lack space, but it certainly makes up for it in style. It is a riot of color: In the living ... It’s quite possible that @paulfeig’s Madison Avenue apartment is the most colorful apartment in all of the Upper East Side. Clocking in at under 1,000 square feet, the one-bedroom, one-and-a-half bath may lack space, but it certainly makes up for it in style. It is a riot of color: In the living room, a hot pink sofa is paired with cerulean velvet wing chairs; in the kitchen, a pink mosaic backsplash, which matches the pink and gold chandelier from Capital lighting, is the centerpiece; and in the bedroom, a sky blue inset in the ceiling molding ensures even the rainiest days outdoors will still be bright inside. “I have very eclectic taste and I really love bright things; I like things that are fun, colorful, and happy,” says Feig, who perhaps is best known as the director of the cult-hit comedy Bridesmaids and the creator of Freaks and Geeks (Feig's latest, @asimplefavor, which he directed, will be released on September 14 and stars @blakelively and @annakendrick47). “When I walked into that apartment, my jaw hit the ground.” The home was turnkey: It had recently undergone a gut renovation under the previous owners, led by designer Heidi James of @studiolxiv. “Literally, I couldn’t find one thing wrong with the place, it was so perfect.” Take the tour of his home through the link in our profile. Photo by @kyle_knodell; text by @julietizon
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Varese, a city in the Alpine foothills about an hour’s train ride to the north of Milan, became popular ...
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Varese, a city in the Alpine foothills about an hour’s train ride to the north of Milan, became popular in the mid-1800s as a getaway for the capital’s wealthy citizens. Today, its best-known residents are probably the @missoni family, fashion’s famous knitwear clan. Ottavio and Rosita ... Varese, a city in the Alpine foothills about an hour’s train ride to the north of Milan, became popular in the mid-1800s as a getaway for the capital’s wealthy citizens. Today, its best-known residents are probably the @missoni family, fashion’s famous knitwear clan. Ottavio and Rosita Missoni established the company nearby in 1953, and the region still serves as the base for design operations and home to many family members. Though Missoni’s iconic zigzag print is now synonymous with movie stars and European aristocrats, Varese remains slow and sleepy—the opposite of what most would consider a hot spot. In 2012, when @mmmargherita Maccapani Missoni, herself a designer and the eldest of the family’s third generation, married Eugenio Amos, a race-car driver who also grew up there, she used the hashtag #VareseThePlaceToBe as an ironic tribute to her beloved hometown. “It was surreal to see all of my friends from the fashion world descend here,” she recalls. The gag went viral, and “it ended up on the front page of the local newspapers!” After she and Amos married, she craved a home where they could put down roots back in Varese. So the next year, after finding the ideal site, the couple enlisted Milan-based architect @aldocibic to build a four-bedroom house there. Missoni Amos insisted on handling the interiors herself. “Which was maybe a mistake,” she admits with a sigh. “I’d never done a house before, and I underestimated how much work it entailed. I thought I’d just be picking out wallpaper. Ha!” Now, five years later, she’s finally wrapped it up. “It turned out to be the biggest job I’ve ever done, and I can’t help but be extremely proud of it.” In the living room, a Paul Evans table sits atop a zebra rug and a Roberto Monsani cabinet fills the wall. Visit the link in our profile to discover more of the home. Photo by @matthieusalvaing; text by @derekblasberg; produced by @janekeltnerdev; styled by @casamota
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For its ninth annual show house (which runs in time with @parisdesignweek), AD France (@ad_magazine) ...
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For its ninth annual show house (which runs in time with @parisdesignweek), AD France (@ad_magazine) asked fifteen firms to conceive and execute rooms in the 15th-century Hôtel de la Bûcherie. The historic building—around the corner from Notre-Dame cathedral—is the future home of the ... For its ninth annual show house (which runs in time with @parisdesignweek), AD France (@ad_magazine) asked fifteen firms to conceive and execute rooms in the 15th-century Hôtel de la Bûcherie. The historic building—around the corner from Notre-Dame cathedral—is the future home of the green-focused real estate company Compagnie de Phalsbourg’s philanthropic incubator. But until then, the space lends itself as work-in-progress: This year’s AD Intérieurs theme is “rough and precious.” In June, the space was under total renovation. Primary-colored hard hats were passed out to members of the press, and we, cups of coffee in hand, were allowed to wander around the construction site’s hazard tape, buckets of rubble, and signs cautioning “Attention risque de chute.” “This is a lab to evolve new forms and techniques in the interior designers’ styles,” AD France’s editor in chief, Marie Kalt, tells us. “There are a lot of young, ascendant designers whom we trust and whom we’d like we like to give visibility among the seasoned names from previous sessions.” See the stunning rooms—such as The Conversation Room by @bismut_architecture, pictured here—on #ADPRO through the link in our profile. Photo by Claire Israel; text by @chantel_lou_tattoli
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In building a stable, polo player and model @nachofigueras wasn’t seeking to just create a shelter—he ...
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In building a stable, polo player and model @nachofigueras wasn’t seeking to just create a shelter—he wanted to create a work of art. Located 45 minutes outside Buenos Aires in the town of General Rodriguez, the structure, which was featured in AD in 2017, takes the spotlight in a new book, ... In building a stable, polo player and model @nachofigueras wasn’t seeking to just create a shelter—he wanted to create a work of art. Located 45 minutes outside Buenos Aires in the town of General Rodriguez, the structure, which was featured in AD in 2017, takes the spotlight in a new book, “Figueras Polo Stables” (@oscarrieraojeda). Architect Juan Ignacio Ramos of @estudio_ramos_, much like Frank Lloyd Wright, took inspiration from the landscape for the stables: the pampas, the lowland plains of Argentina, are known for their vast, flat vistas, and Ramos drew upon this horizontality for the low-slung structures. But he also brought a modern sensibility, looking to the geometric monumentality of Mies Van Der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion, Luis Barragán’s use of water, and Tadao Ando’s work in concrete. The result is a sculptural building serves as much as an aesthetic function as it does practical ones—it is, after all, a home for 44 horses and their trainers, as well as a polo arena. “Some architectural endeavours transcend designed beauty. Their purpose, in and of itself, requires repose, serenity, poetry,” writes author Byron Hawes in the book. “Estudio Ramos’ Figueras Stables is just such a place; a respite from the everyday possessed of a deep-seated relationship with its environment, and an intuitive sense of purpose.” Take a closer look inside through the link in our profile. Photo by Daniel Mac Adden; text by @stefaniewaldek
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Longtime @voguemagazine creative director @therealgracecoddington’s laid-back cottage in ...
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Longtime @voguemagazine creative director @therealgracecoddington’s laid-back cottage in East Hampton is full of stuff. “It’s just full of stuff because my life is full of stuff—I can’t help myself,” she says. “I keep thinking I’m very minimal, but actually, I’m the worst.” But let’s ... Longtime @voguemagazine creative director @therealgracecoddington’s laid-back cottage in East Hampton is full of stuff. “It’s just full of stuff because my life is full of stuff—I can’t help myself,” she says. “I keep thinking I’m very minimal, but actually, I’m the worst.” But let’s be clear: Coddington’s “stuff” encompasses a great many gems, including a vast collection of prints by the stellar roster of photographers she’s worked with and known during her career—Helmut, Mario, Bruce, Patrick, Steven, Annie, and longtime Vogue eminence Mr. Penn—all nonchalantly displayed overlapping on various picture ledges. These trophies are juxtaposed with Coddington’s equally prized, ever-expanding collection of cat paraphernalia. (She and her partner Didier Malige share the house with two beloved Persians, Pumpkin and Blanket, the latest in a long line of feline family members.) “I can’t help it that people, including myself, are always bringing in cat memorabilia,” she explains, referring to the various artworks, the clowders of vintage Steiff, and even the pair of andirons keeping watch over the roaring afternoon fire. The custom bed by architect @jeffreycayle is topped by vintage cat dolls while the lampshades feature feline illustrations. Take a closer look inside the home through the link in our profile. Photo by Eric Boman; text by @bevansburg
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Jaipur, India, remains fixed in most travelers minds for its oleander-pink monuments and sprawling ...
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Jaipur, India, remains fixed in most travelers minds for its oleander-pink monuments and sprawling royal palaces. But don’t worry, if palatial properties are not your cup of chai, the Pink City also offers an impressive number of smaller options perfect for those searching for something ... Jaipur, India, remains fixed in most travelers minds for its oleander-pink monuments and sprawling royal palaces. But don’t worry, if palatial properties are not your cup of chai, the Pink City also offers an impressive number of smaller options perfect for those searching for something a little more intimate—that is, of course, if you know where to look. The solution? Have an insider open the best boutique hotel doors for you, like we did during a recent architectural crawl curated through @aktravel_usa’s tailor-made travel journey. From historic havelis, to a peppering of pied-à-terres once used by Rajasthani royalty as hunting lodges and garden retreats, Jaipur quickly revealed itself as a hotbed for charming boutique gems. The Suján Rajmahal Palace (@sujanluxury), pictured here, was built more than 250 years ago and became the British Residency during the Raj before becoming the private home of the infamously glamorous His Highness Maharaja Sawai Man Singh II of Jaipur and wife Maharani Gayatri Devi. Although the Rajmahal does have the word palace in it, it’s far from palatial. In fact, the property only has 14 rooms, each of which have their own unique personality as well as pay tribute to the international guests that have graced the Rajmahal over the years (think the Queen Elizabeth II suite, Mountbatten suite, and Kennedy suite). Meanwhile, communal spaces feel like a Wes Anderson movie come to life thanks to the 43 different custom wallpapers designed by Adil Ahmad which tell the story of Jaipur through colorful motifs taken from the city’s royal forts, flag, flora, and fauna. Discover more of the most exceptional, smaller-scale hotels in Jaipur through the link in our profile. Photo by @viatolila; text by @dylangracetravels
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When San Francisco–based interior designer @katiemartinezdesign joined forces with a couple ...
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When San Francisco–based interior designer @katiemartinezdesign joined forces with a couple building their Nantucket summer home, she didn’t need to fall back on the shabby-chic aesthetic that dominates East Coast beach houses. Having been raised in New Jersey herself, Martinez instead ... When San Francisco–based interior designer @katiemartinezdesign joined forces with a couple building their Nantucket summer home, she didn’t need to fall back on the shabby-chic aesthetic that dominates East Coast beach houses. Having been raised in New Jersey herself, Martinez instead drew on her childhood memories of summering out East in a barn that her great grandmother transformed into an idyllic, seasonal escape. “The interiors were simple, comfortable, and filled with art, books, shells, and objects collected by generations,” she recalls.
The rustic setting of her youth served as a central source of inspiration as she collaborated with her clients—along with local architect Lisa Botticelli and contractor Scott O’Connor—to bring their vision to life. “Living in California, I don't often get the opportunity to pull from my New England roots with such abandon,” says Martinez. “The Nantucket project is something that I really understand the spirit of.” Though the construction was done from scratch, there was a desire to establish a strong sense of history in the home’s scale and interiors. “They wanted it to feel like a multigenerational home that had been there for a long time,” Martinez notes. Like the other rooms in the house, the spacious kitchen with its white wood-paneled walls and fumed white oak flooring by @babawoodfloors invites you to relax and stay awhile. Katie Martinez integrated thoughtful details such as a furniture-like walnut-topped island and a homey hutch, with a country-style plate rack—in lieu of upper cabinetry—to balance other luxurious touches. Visit the link in our bio to take a tour of the home. Photo by @malcolmabrown; text by @hldoolin
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When AD’s executive director of digital Keith Pollock (@mrpollock) and his best friend, @johnguigui, ...
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When AD’s executive director of digital Keith Pollock (@mrpollock) and his best friend, @johnguigui, first saw *the* house—traditional cedar shake-sided with shutters built in 1870 on the South Shore of Long Island—it wasn’t the actual house that drew them in. The real charm lay in the ... When AD’s executive director of digital Keith Pollock (@mrpollock) and his best friend, @johnguigui, first saw *the* house—traditional cedar shake-sided with shutters built in 1870 on the South Shore of Long Island—it wasn’t the actual house that drew them in. The real charm lay in the 1,100-square-foot structure out back: a large peak-ceilinged barn that previous owners had converted, with meticulous detail, into a guest cottage, seen here. Aesthetically, the barn’s mix of old and new appealed to Pollock and Guidi, weekend antiques hunters and avid collectors of objects, with sunken-in rooms featuring original wainscoting and brick floors. But it also made the property an ideal setup for sharing. “John and I had decided to go in on a house together, but still hadn’t figured out what that might look like,” says Keith, who had planned to spend weekends at the house, while John lived there full-time. What could be more ideal than a single piece of property with two distinct homes? The sunroom of the cottage features a sofa by Vico Magistretti with a @kvadrattextiles pillow by @rafsimons, and vintage dining chairs by Guillerme et Chambron. Visit the link in our profile to see the renovation project on @getclever. Photo by @gievesanderson; text by @alig01950
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@ryankorban had just settled into a new apartment when the designer noticed a for rent sign outside ...
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@ryankorban had just settled into a new apartment when the designer noticed a for rent sign outside a turn-of-the-century townhouse on New York’s Upper East Side. He didn’t hesitate to inquire. “I’m a serial mover,” admits the AD100 talent, who’s lived in nine different places in the last ... @ryankorban had just settled into a new apartment when the designer noticed a for rent sign outside a turn-of-the-century townhouse on New York’s Upper East Side. He didn’t hesitate to inquire. “I’m a serial mover,” admits the AD100 talent, who’s lived in nine different places in the last 14 years. “And it was beautiful—it felt like Europe. I fell in love,” he adds of the 1,800-square-foot duplex that he now calls home, the courtyard of which is pictured here. Impulsive as the move might have seemed, it was meant to be. “This is most true to my taste,” says Korban, who, for the past decade, has led the pack of young decorators bringing new energy to the design industry. His second book, “Ryan Korban: Interiors” (@rizzolibooks), out this month, presents his take on modern rooms with a range of innovative projects, including @alexanderwangny’s polished bachelor pad, @balenciaga’s monolithic SoHo flagship, and the highly anticipated luxury building @40bleeckerstreet. Take a look inside the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @franparente; text by @karinnelson23
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When fashion designer Margherita Maccapani Missoni (@mmmargherita) married race car driver ...
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When fashion designer Margherita Maccapani Missoni (@mmmargherita) married race car driver Eugenio Amos in their hometown of Varese, Italy, she craved a home where they could put down roots back in the place they grew up. After finding the ideal site, the couple enlisted Milan-based architect ... When fashion designer Margherita Maccapani Missoni (@mmmargherita) married race car driver Eugenio Amos in their hometown of Varese, Italy, she craved a home where they could put down roots back in the place they grew up. After finding the ideal site, the couple enlisted Milan-based architect @aldocibic to build a four-bedroom house there. Missoni Amos insisted on handling the interiors herself. “Which was maybe a mistake,” she admits with a sigh. “I’d never done a house before, and I underestimated how much work it entailed. I thought I’d just be picking out wallpaper. Ha!” The daring design sense that’s part of Missoni Amos’s DNA is evident throughout the house. A garden mural painted by @pictalabmilano, an artist collective based in Milan, covers the dining room’s walls—and ceiling. Bold Josef Frank for @svenskttenn chairs surround a table dressed in @missonihome textiles. “My Missoni upbringing–the use of pattern, color and texture–was obviously a big influence,” Missoni Amos concedes. Click the link in our profile for a closer look at the home. Photo by @matthieusalvaing; text by @derekblasberg; produced by @janekeltnerdev; styled by @casamota
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“When I was young, we’d spend weekends in Stonington, Connecticut. I’ve always been enchanted ...
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“When I was young, we’d spend weekends in Stonington, Connecticut. I’ve always been enchanted with New England beach culture,” says Kevin Wendle (@kevin777). Though he calls Tulum, Mexico home base (he purchased the @hotelesencia in 2014), Wendle now also has a stately 1903 “cottage” ... “When I was young, we’d spend weekends in Stonington, Connecticut. I’ve always been enchanted with New England beach culture,” says Kevin Wendle (@kevin777). Though he calls Tulum, Mexico home base (he purchased the @hotelesencia in 2014), Wendle now also has a stately 1903 “cottage” on a bluff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean in the coastal village of Watch Hill, Rhode Island. “I wanted my boys to feel a connection to their identity as Americans,” he says. Of course, the house itself—a 10,000-square-foot shingled pile redolent of patrician East Coast style—exuded its own allure. “It was magnificently handsome,” Wendle says, describing his initial reaction to the home. “The challenge was to bring it back to life in a meaningful way—something stylish, yes, but more important, something comfortable for my family, attuned to the way we like to live.” To that end, Wendle tapped designer @studiogiancarlovalle to reimagine the historic home with contemporary interiors laden with treasures of 20th- and 21st-century design. Take a look inside through the link in our profile. Photo by @stephenkentjohnson; text by @mayer.rus; styled by @michaelbargo
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With its exposed steel beams, @juliedelibran’s Paris home feels more like a New York loft than the ...
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With its exposed steel beams, @juliedelibran’s Paris home feels more like a New York loft than the Haussmanian jewel box she once lived in above with its chiseled crown moldings. “It’s quite industrial,” the artistic director of @soniarykiel notes. “This is not the typical French architecture ... With its exposed steel beams, @juliedelibran’s Paris home feels more like a New York loft than the Haussmanian jewel box she once lived in above with its chiseled crown moldings. “It’s quite industrial,” the artistic director of @soniarykiel notes. “This is not the typical French architecture that you find in Paris.” De Libran tapped #AD100 architect @charles_zana to help transform the structure that formerly served as an archive into an airy home for her family while maintaining the home’s original spirit. To do so, Zana explains, he “opened the spaces, uncovered the underlying brick and steel, and reoriented the house to the gardens.” The ground floor is basically one big room dominated by several massive pieces; there’s a large, somewhat separate, eat-in kitchen off to the side, but its double doors stay mostly open. A Danish bookshelf from the 1950s, seen here, takes up one entire wall—de Libran found it years ago in the Paris flea market but never really had a place for it before. An enormous brass hood—conceived as a piece of sculpture, notes Zana—occupies another wall. Down the middle runs the longest sofa you have ever seen; designed by Zana, it’s split so that one side faces the fireplace, the other the back garden. Discover more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @ambroisetezenas; text by Joshua Levine; styled by @carolinairving
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“I’m a Southern designer, but I don’t feel limited by what that means,” says Alabama architect @jeffreydungan ...
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“I’m a Southern designer, but I don’t feel limited by what that means,” says Alabama architect @jeffreydungan who shares many of his insights in a new book called “The Nature of Home: Creating Timeless Houses” (@rizzolibooks). For his own house nestled on the slopes of Birmingham’s Red ... “I’m a Southern designer, but I don’t feel limited by what that means,” says Alabama architect @jeffreydungan who shares many of his insights in a new book called “The Nature of Home: Creating Timeless Houses” (@rizzolibooks). For his own house nestled on the slopes of Birmingham’s Red Mountain where many of the region’s steel industrialists once dwelled, Dungan incorporated steel, brass and bronze finishes as a nod to the area’s 19th-century mining past. But far from a gloomy den—or any cookie-cutter gracious Southern stereotypes—the house is bright and breezy. Concrete pavers by @firerock_inc extend from the living room to the pool terrace, imbuing the space with an approachable indoor-outdoor feel. “Great architecture exacts an emotional response in our hearts—that’s what makes it meaningful and memorable,” says Dungan. Take a tour of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @wabranowicz; text by @jenfernand; furnishings and upholstery curated by @betsybrowninc and @grant_trick
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Before taking on a two-year restoration of this 19th-century Sagaponack house, designer @jackceglic ...
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Before taking on a two-year restoration of this 19th-century Sagaponack house, designer @jackceglic and architect Manuel Fernandez-Casteleiro, carefully considered its scope. “The challenge was to not make it look like we did too much—we wanted it to look like we didn’t do anything,” ... Before taking on a two-year restoration of this 19th-century Sagaponack house, designer @jackceglic and architect Manuel Fernandez-Casteleiro, carefully considered its scope. “The challenge was to not make it look like we did too much—we wanted it to look like we didn’t do anything,” says Ceglic. Indeed, a visitor to the finished home is, by design, not meant to perceive that an arduous “sculpting” process was involved in the renovation, which comprised removing a number of additions so that all that remained was the 2,000-square-foot, original footprint (and one add-on built in the 1920s). One of the initial requests from the home’s owner, composer and conductor Jonathan Sheffer, was to paint the wainscoting white, to which the duo said “absolutely not—it was the only house in the Hamptons we’d ever seen that hadn’t been painted,” recalls Ceglic. The fir panels lining the interior walls, with their nautical aura and slightly green cast, were meticulously removed and numbered during the renovation, so they could be reinstalled in place after the core was totally rebuilt. In the intimate dining nook next to the kitchen, one truly gets a sense of the original wood paneling’s green patina. The space features Andries and Hiroko van Onck’s Lem 1985 height-adjustable table by @magis_official, Berber carpeting, a Lily Chair by Arne Jacobson, a brass stool by Harvey Probber, and a French bistro chair. The paintings, from top, are by @farmiga and David Storey. Discover more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @twilliamsphoto; text by @davidfoxley; styled by @colinking
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For his own home in Birmingham, AL, architect @jeffreydungan incorporated a moody palette that ...
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For his own home in Birmingham, AL, architect @jeffreydungan incorporated a moody palette that references blacksmiths and iron forges as a nod to the area’s 19th-century mining past. There are also subtle tributes to the English Gothic style and Arts and Crafts movement, including arched ... For his own home in Birmingham, AL, architect @jeffreydungan incorporated a moody palette that references blacksmiths and iron forges as a nod to the area’s 19th-century mining past. There are also subtle tributes to the English Gothic style and Arts and Crafts movement, including arched ceilings and glass rondels in the master bath. But far from a gloomy den—or any cookie-cutter gracious Southern stereotypes—the house is bright and breezy. “I’m a closet modernist and natural-light freak,” Dungan says, noting that the house is a perfect square turned to the sun at a 45-degree angle to disperse light in different rooms at different times of day. “It’s almost like living in a sundial,” he says. Low-slung modern furnishings and upholstery curated with help from designers @betsybrowninc and @grant_trick, respectively—results in a surprisingly nuanced home that has become the backdrop for a life well lived. In the bedroom, Brown indulged Dungan’s penchant for clean lines and dramatic contrasts with a custom console by Peter Flemming and an antique rug by Paige Albright Orientals. The custom headboard by Trick gets a sleek counterpoint from contemporary bedside lamps by @ochreochre. Discover the rest of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @wabranowicz; text by @jenfernand
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It takes ten staff members to gingerly install each nasturtium plant in the Isabella Stewart @gardnermuseum’s ...
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It takes ten staff members to gingerly install each nasturtium plant in the Isabella Stewart @gardnermuseum’s magnificent courtyard. “The vines are up to 20 feet long," explains Stan Kozak, the museum’s chief horticulturist. “So, it’s like a bridal procession, with one person taking ... It takes ten staff members to gingerly install each nasturtium plant in the Isabella Stewart @gardnermuseum’s magnificent courtyard. “The vines are up to 20 feet long," explains Stan Kozak, the museum’s chief horticulturist. “So, it’s like a bridal procession, with one person taking the pot and everyone else carrying a section of the plant with arms out. We walk from the truck, up the stairs into the museum, and then slowly hang them over the third-floor balconies.” For Bostonians, the annual appearance of the 20 nasturtium plants every April is the first sign that spring is on its way. Propagated from cuttings of the preceding generation or germinated from new seeds starting in June, then coddled through the winter in the museum’s greenhouses in nearby Hingham, the vines with their extravagant vermilion flowers only alight for three short weeks. Their brief, dazzling appearance, like the rest of the beloved museum's flora, has been Stan Kozak's work for his entire career. Initially employed as a high school student on a work-study program, Kozak has been a mainstay at the Gardner for almost 50 years. He planned to leave to attend UMass Amherst to study agriculture, but the museum’s senior gardener at the time convinced him to stay on instead.,“The rest is history,” he says, with a shrug. Five decades on, everything he now knows was learned on the job. Visit the link in our profile to learn about the man who keeps the Boston institution in bloom. Photo by Clements Howcroft; text by @dannawrites
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“I like coming here to unplug and feel removed from everything else,” says Dave Macklovitch (@dave1), ...
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“I like coming here to unplug and feel removed from everything else,” says Dave Macklovitch (@dave1), half of the electro-funk band @chromeo. He stumbled on his Brutalist-inflected midcentury retreat on accident when a friend invited him over to her mom’s Laurel Canyon house. “I was like, ... “I like coming here to unplug and feel removed from everything else,” says Dave Macklovitch (@dave1), half of the electro-funk band @chromeo. He stumbled on his Brutalist-inflected midcentury retreat on accident when a friend invited him over to her mom’s Laurel Canyon house. “I was like, ‘Why not?’ I felt voyeuristic,” he explains. One look was all it took for Macklovitch to fall completely in love with the home available for rent. “I was instantly head over heels for it, and I tried to convince my friend’s mom to sell it to me.” When the mom agreed—on the terms that he understood the aesthetic and architectural value of the 1954 John Sjoberg home—he was eager to move his collection of design and art into the space. “I don’t have warehouses of it, but I’m an aficionado,” says Macklovitch of his furniture. It’s a hobby sparked in Brazil in 2010 when a friend introduced him to Oscar Niemeyer and Sergio Rodriguez. “I fell in love with the sinuous, curvy, very sexy Brazilian design from the ‘50s and ‘60s,” he says, and that led to Italian and Danish greats. “When you’re on tour, finish a show, and go back to the hotel, you have two hours to just go online and browse, so that’s the kind of stuff I started learning about,” says Macklovitch. Discover the rest of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @yerinmok; text by @katromeyn
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The world’s oldest ryokan isn’t going anywhere fast: Hōshi, opened in the year 718, is still managed ...
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The world’s oldest ryokan isn’t going anywhere fast: Hōshi, opened in the year 718, is still managed by its same founding family—46 generations and counting. The first ryokan (traditional Japanese inns) were around at the time of the samurai and have remained a chief example of Japanese ... The world’s oldest ryokan isn’t going anywhere fast: Hōshi, opened in the year 718, is still managed by its same founding family—46 generations and counting. The first ryokan (traditional Japanese inns) were around at the time of the samurai and have remained a chief example of Japanese hospitality’s exacting format. Shoji-screen walls, framed gardens, futon bedding, tatami floors, no shoes, and bend-over-backward service are among the unchanged hallmarks of the ryokan experience. But recently, ryokan have begun to break new ground. No longer stuck in the countryside, upscale iterations like @hoshinoya.official take on the metropolis, while guntû, the first floating ryokan, brought the concept to the sea. And Japan's traditional lodging is no longer exclusive to its homeland—ryokan-inspired boutiques and suites have sprung up from Malibu to Mexico City. Opened just last month, @gaigehouseryokan, pictured here, took to wine country, outfitting a centuries-old building in Sonoma Valley with the soothing accents of ryokan interiors. The former hotel was known for its Asian modernism, but it has been taken up a notch with Ryokan Zen suites. The landscape, meanwhile, aims to bring Japanese landscaping into the fold; expect garden pagodas, pocket zen gardens, and plenty of room for wellness (think meditation decks and forest bathing). Visit the link in our profile to discover where to find Japanese hospitality outside of Japan. Photo by Trinette Reed Photography; text by @keithflanny
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“It’s just a place where you can come in and throw yourself on the sofa and put your feet up,” says legendary ...
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“It’s just a place where you can come in and throw yourself on the sofa and put your feet up,” says legendary @voguemagazine fashion editor @therealgracecoddington of the Long Island home she shares with her partner of 35 years, French hairstylist Didier Malige (@bartpumpkin). Indeed, ... “It’s just a place where you can come in and throw yourself on the sofa and put your feet up,” says legendary @voguemagazine fashion editor @therealgracecoddington of the Long Island home she shares with her partner of 35 years, French hairstylist Didier Malige (@bartpumpkin). Indeed, nothing—from the antique Native American rugs scattered on the floors to the vintage pillows and throws—is too precious to be used. Even the large all-white linen-slipcovered sofas by George Sherlock in the main sitting room seem to have a come-hither quality. A sense of place—and a sense of Grace—is present in spades, evident in all the photos, books, and curiosities on display. “This home isn’t actually designed,” she says. “It’s just full of stuff because my life is full of stuff—I can’t help myself. I keep thinking I’m very minimal, but actually, I’m the worst. I’m finally ready to own up to the extent of things that I’ve amassed—at the ripe old age of 77!” Let’s be clear: Coddington’s “stuff” encompasses a great many gems, including a vast collection of prints by the stellar roster of photographers she’s worked with and known during her career—Helmut, Mario, Bruce, Patrick, Steven, Annie, and longtime Vogue eminence Mr. Penn—all nonchalantly displayed overlapping on various picture ledges. Visit the link in our profile for a tour of the home. Photo by Eric Boman; text by @bevansburg
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Every morning, LA-based artist @petershire starts his day with a cup of coffee he makes here in his ...
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Every morning, LA-based artist @petershire starts his day with a cup of coffee he makes here in his studio, a ritual he extends to anyone who visits. Any guest lucky enough to partake will find themselves surrounded by canoes strung from the ceiling, stacks of ceramic sculptures, and white ... Every morning, LA-based artist @petershire starts his day with a cup of coffee he makes here in his studio, a ritual he extends to anyone who visits. Any guest lucky enough to partake will find themselves surrounded by canoes strung from the ceiling, stacks of ceramic sculptures, and white open shelves filled with colorful mugs. An original member of the Memphis Group (a post-modern design collaborative founded by Ettore Sottsass in the early 1980s that's having something of a revival today), Peter Shire is probably best known for his color-blocked chairs and spatter-paint mugs. All of his fearless designs starts here, in a 6,000-square-foot studio nestled on a shaded street in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Before Peter made this space his studio, it was home to a fine art courier service. And though he kept most of the layout the same, there were still renovations to be done, like scraping and repainting the peeling and chipped ceiling. He used nearly 80 gallons of white paint, only to find that over time the cracks in the surface would return. “Certain things are going to be, you know...” he laughs. “Why bother?" Take a look inside Shire’s studio and nearby home on @getclever through the link in our profile. Photo by @timhirschmann; text by @corynnestudio
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@chezdede isn’t just an accessories brand, it’s an atelier, boutique, and gallery all in one. After ...
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@chezdede isn’t just an accessories brand, it’s an atelier, boutique, and gallery all in one. After working as creative directors and designers for Italian luxury brands, founders Daria Reina and Andrea Ferolla decided to open Chez Dédé in 2011, drawing from their native Italy—and a little ... @chezdede isn’t just an accessories brand, it’s an atelier, boutique, and gallery all in one. After working as creative directors and designers for Italian luxury brands, founders Daria Reina and Andrea Ferolla decided to open Chez Dédé in 2011, drawing from their native Italy—and a little France, as Reina is half French—for inspiration. “If we were not in Italy, then Chez Dédé simply would not exist,” Reina says. “We are both in love with Italy and the Italian lifestyle is certainly an integral part of our entire creative process.” To celebrate their love for the country, Reina and Ferolla have created a grand tour of Italy through a series of photographs and Ferolla’s illustrations, which are sold at the boutique and published in the book “Italian Chic” (@assouline). The tome loosely follows a trail from north to south, capturing sights and moments that have inspired Reina and Ferolla. “The book, although collecting a good part of our favorite addresses, does not want to be a guide to all the most beautiful places in Italy, partly because it would not be enough of an encyclopedia to collect them all,” says Reina. “But it is a sort of visual path in scattered order that I hope inspires those who browse it to book a plane ticket to come and create their own personal itinerary. Buon Viaggio!” Photo of the Grand Hotel Ambasciatori’s sunbathing pier in Sorrento by Daria Reina; text by @stefaniewaldek
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When fashion designer Margherita Maccapani Missoni (@mmmargherita) married race car driver ...
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When fashion designer Margherita Maccapani Missoni (@mmmargherita) married race car driver Eugenio Amos in their hometown of Varese, Italy, she craved a home where they could put down roots back in the place they grew up. After finding the ideal site, the couple enlisted Milan-based architect ... When fashion designer Margherita Maccapani Missoni (@mmmargherita) married race car driver Eugenio Amos in their hometown of Varese, Italy, she craved a home where they could put down roots back in the place they grew up. After finding the ideal site, the couple enlisted Milan-based architect @aldocibic to build a four-bedroom house there. Missoni Amos insisted on handling the interiors herself. “Which was maybe a mistake,” she admits with a sigh. “I’d never done a house before, and I underestimated how much work it entailed. I thought I’d just be picking out wallpaper. Ha!” Now, five years later, she’s finally wrapped it up. “It turned out to be the biggest job I’ve ever done, and I can’t help but be extremely proud of it.” The daring design sense that’s part of Missoni Amos’s DNA is evident throughout the house. The kitchen floor and walls are clad in a punchy artisanal tile by @domenico_mori. “It turned out to be the most expensive material per square foot in the entire house, which my husband is still trying to make sense of.” Stools found at a flea market surround a custom table by Busnelli Corporate. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @matthieusalvaing; text by @derekblasberg; produced by @janekeltnerdev; styled by @casamota
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Visitors that stroll through the Lasipalatsi Square in Helsinki are likely to find a new addition: ...
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Visitors that stroll through the Lasipalatsi Square in Helsinki are likely to find a new addition: five concrete windowed domes. This isn’t an art installation, though it very well could be. It’s part of the new Amos Rex museum (@amoskonst), which opened in the Finnish capital today. The ... Visitors that stroll through the Lasipalatsi Square in Helsinki are likely to find a new addition: five concrete windowed domes. This isn’t an art installation, though it very well could be. It’s part of the new Amos Rex museum (@amoskonst), which opened in the Finnish capital today. The new 23,500-square-foot space was designed by Helsinki’s @jkmmarchitects firm. The $57 million structure boasts a maze of underground exhibition rooms—none of which have pillars—with skylights providing serious wow factor. Above ground, the skylights appear to be island-like mounds in the urban square, which passersby can climb onto for epic selfies. The skylights also have pipe-like windows that allow people aboveground to peer down into the exhibition space, sparking curiosity about the art that lies below. See more of the design museum through the link in our profile. Photo by @tuomasuusheimo; text by @nadjasayej
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“I’m a closet modernist and natural-light freak,” Alabama architect @jeffreydungan says of designing ...
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“I’m a closet modernist and natural-light freak,” Alabama architect @jeffreydungan says of designing his own home in Birmingham. Though he intentionally incorporated a moody palette of steel, brass and bronze as a nod to the area’s 19th-century mining past, the home is far from a gloomy ... “I’m a closet modernist and natural-light freak,” Alabama architect @jeffreydungan says of designing his own home in Birmingham. Though he intentionally incorporated a moody palette of steel, brass and bronze as a nod to the area’s 19th-century mining past, the home is far from a gloomy den. Dungan notes that the house is a perfect square turned to the sun at a 45-degree angle to disperse light in different rooms at different times of day. “It’s almost like living in a sundial,” he says. The living room’s whitewashed wood and concrete pavers add to the bright and breezy ambiance while an imposing fireplace surround by Darren Hardeman recalls the blacksmiths and iron forges of Birmingham’s past. “I wanted to find balance through asymmetrical means,” he says of its placement in a corner or the room rather than at its center. Take a tour of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @wabranowicz; text by @jenfernand; furnishings and upholstery curated by @betsybrowninc and @grant_trick
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When @chromeo music artist Dave Macklovitch (@dave1) had the opportunity to buy a Brutalist-inspired ...
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When @chromeo music artist Dave Macklovitch (@dave1) had the opportunity to buy a Brutalist-inspired 1954 home designed by Dutch architect John Sjoberg, he decided to move cross-country for it. “I was instantly head over heels for it,” says Macklovitch who was formerly residing in the ... When @chromeo music artist Dave Macklovitch (@dave1) had the opportunity to buy a Brutalist-inspired 1954 home designed by Dutch architect John Sjoberg, he decided to move cross-country for it. “I was instantly head over heels for it,” says Macklovitch who was formerly residing in the West Village of NYC. After the purchase, the design and art collector—“I don’t have warehouses of it, but I’m an aficionado”—simply moved everything in, since he already owned most of the furnishings. It’s a hobby sparked in Brazil in 2010 when a friend introduced him to Oscar Niemeyer and Sergio Rodriguez. “I fell in love with the sinuous, curvy, very sexy Brazilian design from the ‘50s and ‘60s,” he says, and that led to Italian and Danish greats. The house essentially designed itself. “That’s why I wanted it, because I knew it was going to work,” he says. He bought only a couple of credenzas and bits. It was kismet. Occasional chairs and a table by Poul Kjaerholm, a favorite Danish designer, felt like a no-brainer, as was a Hans Wegner leather and metal sofa. For accents he went “'60s space-age” with a spherical Ricardo Fasanello chair he imported from Brazil and a Joe Colombo Elda chair that’s perfectly futuristic ‘60s Italian. “I thought that would be a nice juxtaposition,” says Macklovitch, who decorated his parents’ and brother’s houses as well, using much of his own Brazilian midcentury collection. Take a tour of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @yerinmok; text by @katromeyn
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Interior and furniture designer Jérôme @faillantdumas admits to being obsessive about even the ...
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Interior and furniture designer Jérôme @faillantdumas admits to being obsessive about even the minutest details in the home. Such careful focus was likely instilled by a childhood spent creeping about the Louvre after-hours with his mother, who ran its research laboratory. “I remember ... Interior and furniture designer Jérôme @faillantdumas admits to being obsessive about even the minutest details in the home. Such careful focus was likely instilled by a childhood spent creeping about the Louvre after-hours with his mother, who ran its research laboratory. “I remember seeing Leonardo’s paint very close,” he says. This love of detail is boldly evidenced in his own Georgian townhouse in London that he shares with his wife Anda Rowland and their son, Felix. In the travertine-paneled master bathroom pictured here, Faillant-Dumas calls attention to a brass-framed light box hung above the shower. “A spotlight is hard and horrible,” he says. “This is much more gentle.” A mirror by Faillant-Dumas (for his company @l.o.v.e.editions) hangs above a vanity from the @watermonopoly with fittings by @wtrwrks. Visit the link in our profile to take a tour of the home. Photo by @simonuptonphotos; text by @alice__bb; styled by @carolinairving
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Hubert de Givenchy and Philippe Venet ran their own couture houses, but together the couple created ...
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Hubert de Givenchy and Philippe Venet ran their own couture houses, but together the couple created Le Jonchet, a fashionable country retreat with an urbane attitude two hours outside of Paris. AD spoke with Venet and friends of the couple about the manor following Givenchy’s death in March. ... Hubert de Givenchy and Philippe Venet ran their own couture houses, but together the couple created Le Jonchet, a fashionable country retreat with an urbane attitude two hours outside of Paris. AD spoke with Venet and friends of the couple about the manor following Givenchy’s death in March. “[Hubert] had a wonderful sense of scale that I call the Givenchy eye,” recalls socialite Mercedes Bass. “A brilliant landscape architect—the most amazing I’ve met in my life—decorator, and designer, he also would have been a marvelous antiques dealer.” Adds socialite and style icon Deeda Blair, “Gardens were a mutual passion, so when Hubert visited Bunny [Mellon] at Oak Spring, as he did frequently, she would take him to see great houses in Virginia. Mount Vernon’s kitchen garden was the inspiration for the one at Le Jonchet.” Click the link in our profile to see inside the manor and around the grounds. Photo by @pablucozam; text by @adaesthete
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“When you’re an architect or designer, you have so many different ideas of what home is and the feeling ...
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“When you’re an architect or designer, you have so many different ideas of what home is and the feeling you’re trying to communicate,” says Alabama architect @jeffreydungan, who has spent his 25-year career discerning the needs of others but finally did enough soul-searching to accommodate ... “When you’re an architect or designer, you have so many different ideas of what home is and the feeling you’re trying to communicate,” says Alabama architect @jeffreydungan, who has spent his 25-year career discerning the needs of others but finally did enough soul-searching to accommodate his own. “You have to ask yourself, ‘What do you want?’; for me it was a self-realization that surprised me.” His dream home turned out to be a light-filled aerie overlooking Birmingham, where he could experiment with bold choices while paying homage to the city’s industrial beginnings. Though the house is nestled on the slopes of Red Mountain, named for its rich iron-ore deposits and the place where many of the region’s steel industrialists once dwelled, the historical resonance runs deeper than the three-bedroom structure’s geographical footprint. As a nod to Birmingham’s 19th-century mining past, Dungan incorporated steel doors and fluted glass, brass and bronze finishes that would patina over time, and a moody palette that references blacksmiths and iron forges. But far from a gloomy den—or any cookie-cutter gracious Southern stereotypes—the house is bright and breezy, not least in the living room, pictured here, where whitewashed wood and concrete pavers by @firerock_inc meet sculpturally carved walls that reveal light through negative space. Visit the link in our profile to take a tour of the home. Photo by @wabranowicz; text by @jenfernand
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Sometimes the best way to see the world isn’t by plane or train but by strapping on some hiking boots ...
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Sometimes the best way to see the world isn’t by plane or train but by strapping on some hiking boots and hitting the trail to experience the landscape up close. For those who like to explore on foot, @lonelyplanet has assembled “Epic Hikes of the World,” a guide to 200 can’t-miss treks on six ... Sometimes the best way to see the world isn’t by plane or train but by strapping on some hiking boots and hitting the trail to experience the landscape up close. For those who like to explore on foot, @lonelyplanet has assembled “Epic Hikes of the World,” a guide to 200 can’t-miss treks on six continents. The book includes a variety of distances and difficulty levels, from day hikes in South Africa to a five-month-long journey across the Pacific Coast. Each section is anchored by firsthand accounts and includes alternatives for each type of hike, with options for history buffs, animal lovers, and urban explorers. In Alberta’s Jasper National Park, pictured here, the 27-mile-long Skyline Trail goes from Maligne Lake to Maligne Canyon with more than half of the trek above the tree line, offering spectacular views of the Canadian Rockies. Discover more of the most beautiful hikes around the world that are worth traveling for through the link in our profile. Photo by Zhukova Valentyna; text by @stampness
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Dave Macklovitch, half of the electro-funk band @chromeo, wasn't shopping for a house when he first ...
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Dave Macklovitch, half of the electro-funk band @chromeo, wasn't shopping for a house when he first laid eyes on what’s now his analog midcentury Los Angeles retreat. The Montreal-born West Village denizen wasn’t in the market; he’d just wrapped a tour. But, for whatever reason, as it happened, ... Dave Macklovitch, half of the electro-funk band @chromeo, wasn't shopping for a house when he first laid eyes on what’s now his analog midcentury Los Angeles retreat. The Montreal-born West Village denizen wasn’t in the market; he’d just wrapped a tour. But, for whatever reason, as it happened, he wound up taking the suggestion of a friend who thought he’d enjoy seeing her mom’s Laurel Canyon house. “I was like, ‘Why not?’ I felt voyeuristic,” he explains. One look was all it took for Macklovitch—whose stage name is @dave1—to fall completely in love with the home available for rent. “I was instantly head over heels for it, and I tried to convince my friend’s mom to sell it to me.” But money was not really what she was after. Above all else, “She wanted to make sure I understood the aesthetic and architectural value of the house,” says the musician, 40, of the two-bedroom 1954 home designed by Dutch architect John Sjoberg (the architect originally designed the residence for himself). Macklovitch knew it was special because the midcentury signatures—wraparound windows, low ceilings, an indoor-outdoor feel—intermingle with powerful Brutalist accents, a style he’s fond of thanks to his native Montreal. “So I actually laid out all the furniture I would bring to the house, and the look and feel I would give the place, and then she was like, ‘Alright, you can have it,’” he says. Visit the link in our profile to see how he decorated to perfection. Photo by @yerinmok; text by @katromeyn
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Mexico City’s latest boutique destinations feel more like the home of your dreams than mere places ...
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Mexico City’s latest boutique destinations feel more like the home of your dreams than mere places to stay, with living rooms that are perfectly chic and comfortable enough for lingering and leafy rooftop retreats that were designed as much for relaxing over breakfast as they were for sipping ... Mexico City’s latest boutique destinations feel more like the home of your dreams than mere places to stay, with living rooms that are perfectly chic and comfortable enough for lingering and leafy rooftop retreats that were designed as much for relaxing over breakfast as they were for sipping cocktails at sunset. @ignaciamx, pictured here, is a year-old inn in the Roma neighborhood that is set within two buildings: a 1913 home and a modern addition, with a beautiful garden in between that’s dotted with orange trees planted by Ignacia, the original housekeeper and hotel namesake. Old meets new in the historic half, where original ceilings, doors, and wood floors blend seamlessly with fresh, blush-color walls, emerald-green couches, and marble tables. Each of its five rooms are done up in a single color—blue, pink, green, yellow, and a super-sleek all-black master suite. Discover more from Mexico City’s design-hotel boom through the link in our profile. Photo regram @wildterrains; text by @brookeporterkatz
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“Before, I put a lot of things on the wall, perhaps as armor. In this place, I took a much more intellectualized ...
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“Before, I put a lot of things on the wall, perhaps as armor. In this place, I took a much more intellectualized approach to the whole thing,” says supermodel @erinwasson of her recently completed Malibu home. The result is an airy, bright space in a palette of whites and pinks. And while it ... “Before, I put a lot of things on the wall, perhaps as armor. In this place, I took a much more intellectualized approach to the whole thing,” says supermodel @erinwasson of her recently completed Malibu home. The result is an airy, bright space in a palette of whites and pinks. And while it is certainly more paired down than her previous homes, a visitor would be forgiven for wanting to know the provenance of nearly every object. She worked hand in hand with her business partner and collaborator, interior designer @joshevaninteriors, to reinvent her aesthetic for her new house. “We’ve been putting spaces together since we were teenagers in Texas,” Evan says. “For this house, we wanted to keep it super minimal." After a moment, he adds with a laugh: "Well, for Erin it's minimal, because she's been such a collector and maximalist over all these years." Take a tour of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @christopherpatey; text by @julietizon; styled by @paigecwassel
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Since the 1960s, James Turrell, the 75-year-old American artist who studied perceptual psychology, ...
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Since the 1960s, James Turrell, the 75-year-old American artist who studied perceptual psychology, has been fixated on light and all the ways he can manipulate it with space and color. But the power of Turrell’s work—most often large-scale installations—is that it’s all about you, the ... Since the 1960s, James Turrell, the 75-year-old American artist who studied perceptual psychology, has been fixated on light and all the ways he can manipulate it with space and color. But the power of Turrell’s work—most often large-scale installations—is that it’s all about you, the viewer. "My work is not so much about my seeing as about your seeing. There is no one between you and your experience,” says the legendary orchestrator of light whose permanent installations you can find in 29 countries. An avid pilot with a lifelong fascination in merging earth and sky, Turrell considers his studio and canvas the sky, his medium pure light. The artist is best known for his Skyspaces, chambers open to the heavens through an aperture in the ceiling. These observatories—much like all of his work—are designed to be places of contemplative thought. So what are you looking at? Turrell throws it back to you: “You are looking at you looking. What is important to me is to create an experience of wordless thought.” “Encounter,” pictured here, opened to the public in 2015 in the lush Botanical Gardens of Culiacan in Sinaloa, Mexico, and has a unique elliptical shape which, when viewed from above, resembles the shape of an eye. Discover the most unusual places around the world to see James Turrell’s art installations through the link in our profile. Photo by @moritzbernoully; text by @k_rellihan
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With its exposed steel beams, @juliedelibran’s Paris home feels more like a New York loft than the ...
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With its exposed steel beams, @juliedelibran’s Paris home feels more like a New York loft than the Haussmanian jewel box she once occupied above with its chiseled crown moldings. “It’s quite industrial,” the artistic director of @soniarykiel notes. “This is not the typical French architecture ... With its exposed steel beams, @juliedelibran’s Paris home feels more like a New York loft than the Haussmanian jewel box she once occupied above with its chiseled crown moldings. “It’s quite industrial,” the artistic director of @soniarykiel notes. “This is not the typical French architecture that you find in Paris.” De Libran tapped #AD100 architect @charles_zana to help transform the structure that formerly served as an archive into an airy home for her family while maintaining the home’s original spirit. In a powder room, a silver travertine sink by @charles_zana is surrounded by bold red walls painted by Atelier @meriguetcarrere. Discover more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @ambroisetezenas; text by Joshua Levine; styled by @carolinairving
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Whether it’s a starchitect or an under-the-radar designer, museums have proved to be a timeless ...
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Whether it’s a starchitect or an under-the-radar designer, museums have proved to be a timeless destination for challenging the boundaries of design. And since one of the roles of any structure is to welcome its visitors, it makes sense that these public venues are stunning designs meant ... Whether it’s a starchitect or an under-the-radar designer, museums have proved to be a timeless destination for challenging the boundaries of design. And since one of the roles of any structure is to welcome its visitors, it makes sense that these public venues are stunning designs meant to entice patrons into its doors. We surveyed the most beautifully designed museum in each U.S. state—keeping in mind that sometimes the most remarkable museums are also ones intended to entertain children. Our pick for North Carolina is the @ncartmuseum, pictured here, which was established in 1947, but received a 2010 energy-efficient West Building expansion, designed by Thomas Pfifer and Partners. Discover our list of the best museums in every state through the link in our profile. Text by @kristineahansen
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