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Cate Blanchett is fantastic in "The Gift," another magical ethereal murder mystery movie, with ...
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Cate Blanchett is fantastic in "The Gift," another magical ethereal murder mystery movie, with a Voodoo/ESP twist.Cate's Louisiana Cajun accent is amazing, Brits, are best, UK,Cate Blanchett is Audrey Hepburn in terms of talent,ability, overall stage presense and ja na sais quoi. Cate Blanchett is fantastic in "The Gift," another magical ethereal murder mystery movie, with a Voodoo/ESP twist.Cate's Louisiana Cajun accent is amazing, Brits, are best, UK,Cate Blanchett is Audrey Hepburn in terms of talent,ability, overall stage presense and ja na sais quoi.
Victims of sexual assault in military have no justice,their fate is decided in the chain of command,base ...
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Victims of sexual assault in military have no justice,their fate is decided in the chain of command,base commander,where the sexual assault occurs.Of 26, 000 sexual assault reported,3,000 go beyond the investigation stage,of 3,000,only 300 are found guilty, serve1yr,less, outrage! Victims of sexual assault in military have no justice,their fate is decided in the chain of command,base commander,where the sexual assault occurs.Of 26, 000 sexual assault reported,3,000 go beyond the investigation stage,of 3,000,only 300 are found guilty, serve1yr,less, outrage!
Ayrton Senna is con. to be best Formula One driver in its history,won the Montego Form.one 6 times.No ...
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Ayrton Senna is con. to be best Formula One driver in its history,won the Montego Form.one 6 times.No one has done that. He won,Grand Slam,Montego, Indianapolis,Le Mans,devote Catholic,read Bible daily;gave away his fortune, to poor of Brasil. Ayrton Senna is con. to be best Formula One driver in its history,won the Montego Form.one 6 times.No one has done that. He won,Grand Slam,Montego, Indianapolis,Le Mans,devote Catholic,read Bible daily;gave away his fortune, to poor of Brasil.
Medical benefactor of Alcoholics Anonymous,Dr.William Silkworth, M.D.,first doctor to call ...
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Medical benefactor of Alcoholics Anonymous,Dr.William Silkworth, M.D.,first doctor to call alcoholism what it is,a disease, he deliniates mental obsession&physical cravings of alcoholism in the forward, Text of AA, Alcoholis Anonymous,"Big Book."Dr.Silkworth's forward,"The ... Medical benefactor of Alcoholics Anonymous,Dr.William Silkworth, M.D.,first doctor to call alcoholism what it is,a disease, he deliniates mental obsession&physical cravings of alcoholism in the forward, Text of AA, Alcoholis Anonymous,"Big Book."Dr.Silkworth's forward,"The Doctor's Opinion."
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Bill Wilson, co- founder of AA, Alcoholics Anonymous&Lois Wilson, his wife, this is their motorcycle/camping ...
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Bill Wilson, co- founder of AA, Alcoholics Anonymous&Lois Wilson, his wife, this is their motorcycle/camping trip in Bill Wilson story in the Book of Alcoholics Anonymous,he& his wife investigated companies BillW. recommend to his customers on NY Stock Exc as first stock analyst. Bill Wilson, co- founder of AA, Alcoholics Anonymous&Lois Wilson, his wife, this is their motorcycle/camping trip in Bill Wilson story in the Book of Alcoholics Anonymous,he& his wife investigated companies BillW. recommend to his customers on NY Stock Exc as first stock analyst.
This is another real hero----Dr. Bob Smith, M.D., also responsible for saving millions of lives ...
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This is another real hero----Dr. Bob Smith, M.D., also responsible for saving millions of lives since June 10 th, 1935, his continuous sobriety date, one month after he met Bill Wilson in Akron, Ohio, and Alcoholics Anonymous was thusly formed. This is another real hero----Dr. Bob Smith, M.D., also responsible for saving millions of lives since June 10 th, 1935, his continuous sobriety date, one month after he met Bill Wilson in Akron, Ohio, and Alcoholics Anonymous was thusly formed.
Medieval English Poet Chaucer, 1343-1400 ad. here. If you love Shakespeare, and you would have ...
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Medieval English Poet Chaucer, 1343-1400 ad. here. If you love Shakespeare, and you would have to be a Republican, if you did not, but if you are sane and intelligent, you would love Shakespeare, for reasons you know, and reasons you don't, Iambic pentameter, is one of the reasons why you might ... Medieval English Poet Chaucer, 1343-1400 ad. here. If you love Shakespeare, and you would have to be a Republican, if you did not, but if you are sane and intelligent, you would love Shakespeare, for reasons you know, and reasons you don't, Iambic pentameter, is one of the reasons why you might not know why you love Shakespeare. The beauty of that rhyme is self- apparent as you read Shakespeare. It is the meter or rhyme his plays and sonnets adhere to. Another of my British lit heroes, Chaucer, his meter or rhyme of his verse adheres to what the Italian poets, including greatest Italian poet Dante, adhered to and that was ten syllable rhyme, not a two syllable rhyme as with Shakespeare's Iambic Pentameter. Ancient Roman Poet Virgil, about 19 bce adhered to dactylic hexameter in his narrative Epic Poem, Aeneid, the origins of Ancient Rome as Ancient Greek Poet Homer, about 700-800 bce, in his narrative Epic Poem, The Iliad and Odyssey, the Journey to Troy, The Trojan War, and the Journey back from Troy, as Homer did as well. This Ancient Greek hexameter is conducive to music that was played as Homer 's Iliad and Odyssey was sung in the oral tradition. Virgil's Latin Hexameter was similar but not as conducive to song and the oral tradition of Homer's Greek plays were.

Iambic pentameter
Iambic pentameter /aɪˈæmbɪk pɛnˈtæmᵻtər/ is a commonly used type of metrical line in traditional English poetry and verse drama. The term describes the rhythm that the words establish in that line, which is measured in small groups of syllables called "feet". The word "iambic" refers to the type of foot that is used, known as the iamb, which in English is an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. The word "pentameter" indicates that a line has five of these "feet". Iambic rhythms come relatively naturally in English.[citation needed] Iambic pentameter is the most common meter in English poetry; it is used in many of the major English poetic forms, including blank verse, the heroic couplet, and some of the traditional rhymed stanza forms. William Shakespeare used iambic pentameter in his plays and sonnet

Sample
An iambic foot is an unstressed syllable followed by
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Ancient Roman Poet Virgil here, 70bc-19 bc. If you love Shakespeare, and you would have to be a Republican, ...
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Ancient Roman Poet Virgil here, 70bc-19 bc. If you love Shakespeare, and you would have to be a Republican, if you did not, but if you are sane and intelligent, you would love Shakespeare, for reasons you know, and reasons you don't, Iambic pentameter, is one of the reasons why you might not ... Ancient Roman Poet Virgil here, 70bc-19 bc. If you love Shakespeare, and you would have to be a Republican, if you did not, but if you are sane and intelligent, you would love Shakespeare, for reasons you know, and reasons you don't, Iambic pentameter, is one of the reasons why you might not know why you love Shakespeare. The beauty of that rhyme is self- apparent as you read Shakespeare. It is the meter or rhyme his plays and sonnets adhere to. Another of my British lit heroes, Chaucer, his meter or rhyme of his verse adheres to what the Italian poets, including greatest Italian poet Dante, adhered to and that was ten syllable rhyme, not a two syllable rhyme as with Shakespeare's Iambic Pentameter. Ancient Roman Poet Virgil, about 19 bce adhered to dactylic hexameter in his narrative Epic Poem, Aeneid, the origins of Ancient Rome as Ancient Greek Poet Homer, about 700-800 bce, in his narrative Epic Poem, The Iliad and Odyssey, the Journey to Troy, The Trojan War, and the Journey back from Troy, as Homer did as well. This Ancient Greek hexameter is conducive to music that was played as Homer 's Iliad and Odyssey was sung in the oral tradition. Virgil's Latin Hexameter was similar but not as conducive to song and the oral tradition of Homer's Greek plays were.

Iambic pentameter
Iambic pentameter /aɪˈæmbɪk pɛnˈtæmᵻtər/ is a commonly used type of metrical line in traditional English poetry and verse drama. The term describes the rhythm that the words establish in that line, which is measured in small groups of syllables called "feet". The word "iambic" refers to the type of foot that is used, known as the iamb, which in English is an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. The word "pentameter" indicates that a line has five of these "feet". Iambic rhythms come relatively naturally in English.[citation needed] Iambic pentameter is the most common meter in English poetry; it is used in many of the major English poetic forms, including blank verse, the heroic couplet, and some of the traditional rhymed stanza forms. William Shakespeare used iambic pentameter in his plays and sonnet

Sample
An iambic foot is an unstressed syllable followed by a stre
Read more
Medieval Italian master Poet Dante here, 1265- 1321 ad. If you love Shakespeare, and you would have ...
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Medieval Italian master Poet Dante here, 1265- 1321 ad. If you love Shakespeare, and you would have to be a Republican, if you did not, but if you are sane and intelligent, you would love Shakespeare, for reasons you know, and reasons you don't, Iambic pentameter, is one of the reasons why you ... Medieval Italian master Poet Dante here, 1265- 1321 ad. If you love Shakespeare, and you would have to be a Republican, if you did not, but if you are sane and intelligent, you would love Shakespeare, for reasons you know, and reasons you don't, Iambic pentameter, is one of the reasons why you might not know why you love Shakespeare. The beauty of that rhyme is self- apparent as you read Shakespeare. It is the meter or rhyme his plays and sonnets adhere to. Another of my British lit heroes, Chaucer, his meter or rhyme of his verse adheres to what the Italian poets, including greatest Italian poet Dante, adhered to and that was ten syllable rhyme, not a two syllable rhyme as with Shakespeare's Iambic Pentameter. Ancient Roman Poet Virgil, about 19 bce adhered to dactylic hexameter in his narrative Epic Poem, Aeneid, the origins of Ancient Rome as Ancient Greek Poet Homer, about 700-800 bce, in his narrative Epic Poem, The Iliad and Odyssey, the Journey to Troy, The Trojan War, and the Journey back from Troy, as Homer did as well. This Ancient Greek hexameter is conducive to music that was played as Homer 's Iliad and Odyssey was sung in the oral tradition. Virgil's Latin Hexameter was similar but not as conducive to song and the oral tradition of Homer's Greek plays were.

Iambic pentameter
Iambic pentameter /aɪˈæmbɪk pɛnˈtæmᵻtər/ is a commonly used type of metrical line in traditional English poetry and verse drama. The term describes the rhythm that the words establish in that line, which is measured in small groups of syllables called "feet". The word "iambic" refers to the type of foot that is used, known as the iamb, which in English is an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. The word "pentameter" indicates that a line has five of these "feet". Iambic rhythms come relatively naturally in English.[citation needed] Iambic pentameter is the most common meter in English poetry; it is used in many of the major English poetic forms, including blank verse, the heroic couplet, and some of the traditional rhymed stanza forms. William Shakespeare used iambic pentameter in his plays and sonnet

Sample
An iambic foot is an unstressed syllable follow
Read more
Love Moliere's satire, especially his magnum opus comedy, Tartuffe, 1600's, contemporary of ...
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Love Moliere's satire, especially his magnum opus comedy, Tartuffe, 1600's, contemporary of Shakespeare, and Voltaire (1780's) some say French equivalent to Shakespeare. Molière Jean-Baptiste Poquelin Molière Mignard Chantilly.jpg Portrait of Molière by Pierre Mignard (ca. ... Love Moliere's satire, especially his magnum opus comedy, Tartuffe, 1600's, contemporary of Shakespeare, and Voltaire (1780's) some say French equivalent to Shakespeare.
Molière
Jean-Baptiste Poquelin
Molière Mignard Chantilly.jpg
Portrait of Molière by Pierre Mignard (ca. 1658)
Born January 15, 1622
Paris, France
Died 17 February 1673 (aged 51)
Paris, France
Pen name Molière
Occupation Play writer, actor and stage manager
Nationality French
Period 1645–1673
Genre Comedy
Notable works Tartuffe; The Misanthrope; The Learned Women; The School for Wives; L'Avare
Spouse Armande Béjart
Partner Madeleine Béjart
Children Louis (1664–1664)
Marie Madeleine (1665–1723)
Pierre (1672–1672)
Portrait of Molière by Nicolas Mignard
Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, known by his stage name Molière (/moʊlˈjɛər/;[1] French: [mɔ.ljɛːʁ]; 1622–1673), was a French playwright and actor who is considered to be one of the greatest masters of comedy in Western literature.[2] Among Molière's best known works are The Misanthrope, The School for Wives, Tartuffe, The Miser, The Imaginary Invalid, and The Bourgeois Gentleman.
Born into a prosperous family and having studied at the Collège de Clermont (now Lycée Louis-le-Grand), Molière was well suited to begin a life in the theatre. Thirteen years as an itinerant actor helped him polish his comic abilities while he began writing, combining Commedia dell'arte elements with the more refined French comedy.[3]
Through the patronage of aristocrats including Philippe I, Duke of Orléans—the brother of Louis XIV—Molière procured a command performance before the King at the Louvre. Performing a classic play by Pierre Corneille and a farce of his own, The Doctor in Love, Molière was granted the use of salle du Petit-Bourbon near the Louvre, a spacious room appointed for theatrical performances. Later, Molière was granted the use of the theatre in the Palais-Royal. In both locations he found success among Parisians with plays such as The Affected Ladies, The School for Husbands and The School for Wives. This royal favour brought a royal pension to his troupe and the title Troupe du Roi ("The King's Troupe"). Molière continued as the official author of court entert
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Love Moliere's satire, especially his magnum opus comedy, Tartuffe, 1600's, contemporary of ...
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Love Moliere's satire, especially his magnum opus comedy, Tartuffe, 1600's, contemporary of Shakespeare, and Voltaire (1780's) some say French equivalent to Shakespeare. Molière Jean-Baptiste Poquelin Molière Mignard Chantilly.jpg Portrait of Molière by Pierre Mignard (ca. ... Love Moliere's satire, especially his magnum opus comedy, Tartuffe, 1600's, contemporary of Shakespeare, and Voltaire (1780's) some say French equivalent to Shakespeare.
Molière
Jean-Baptiste Poquelin
Molière Mignard Chantilly.jpg
Portrait of Molière by Pierre Mignard (ca. 1658)
Born January 15, 1622
Paris, France
Died 17 February 1673 (aged 51)
Paris, France
Pen name Molière
Occupation Play writer, actor and stage manager
Nationality French
Period 1645–1673
Genre Comedy
Notable works Tartuffe; The Misanthrope; The Learned Women; The School for Wives; L'Avare
Spouse Armande Béjart
Partner Madeleine Béjart
Children Louis (1664–1664)
Marie Madeleine (1665–1723)
Pierre (1672–1672)
Portrait of Molière by Nicolas Mignard
Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, known by his stage name Molière (/moʊlˈjɛər/;[1] French: [mɔ.ljɛːʁ]; 1622–1673), was a French playwright and actor who is considered to be one of the greatest masters of comedy in Western literature.[2] Among Molière's best known works are The Misanthrope, The School for Wives, Tartuffe, The Miser, The Imaginary Invalid, and The Bourgeois Gentleman.
Born into a prosperous family and having studied at the Collège de Clermont (now Lycée Louis-le-Grand), Molière was well suited to begin a life in the theatre. Thirteen years as an itinerant actor helped him polish his comic abilities while he began writing, combining Commedia dell'arte elements with the more refined French comedy.[3]
Through the patronage of aristocrats including Philippe I, Duke of Orléans—the brother of Louis XIV—Molière procured a command performance before the King at the Louvre. Performing a classic play by Pierre Corneille and a farce of his own, The Doctor in Love, Molière was granted the use of salle du Petit-Bourbon near the Louvre, a spacious room appointed for theatrical performances. Later, Molière was granted the use of the theatre in the Palais-Royal. In both locations he found success among Parisians with plays such as The Affected Ladies, The School for Husbands and The School for Wives. This royal favour brought a royal pension to his troupe and the title Troupe du Roi ("The King's Troupe"). Molière continued as the official author of court entert
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Goethe's, literary masterpiece, his magnum opus, Faust---- he spent over 60 years writing it---- ...
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Goethe's, literary masterpiece, his magnum opus, Faust---- he spent over 60 years writing it---- and it has influenced everyone from Ralph Waldo Emerson, Freud, Jung, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Hegel, Tesla, Mozart, who put Goethe's words into music---Goethe was much more than writer----he ... Goethe's, literary masterpiece, his magnum opus, Faust---- he spent over 60 years writing it---- and it has influenced everyone from Ralph Waldo Emerson, Freud, Jung, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Hegel, Tesla, Mozart, who put Goethe's words into music---Goethe was much more than writer----he was lawyer, botanist, physicist, politician-----he was an equivalent to our Thomas Jefferson, or Jefferson is an American equivalent of Goethe.

Johann Wolfgang (von) Goethe
Goethe (Stieler 1828).jpg
Goethe in 1828
Born 28 August 1749
Frankfurt-am-Main, Holy Roman Empire
Died 22 March 1832 (aged 82)
Weimar, Grand Duchy of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, German Confederation
Occupation Poet, novelist, playwright, natural philosopher, diplomat, civil servant
Nationality German
Alma mater Leipzig University
University of Strasbourg
Literary movement Sturm und Drang
Weimar Classicism
Romanticism in science
Notable works Faust; The Sorrows of Young Werther; Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship; Elective Affinities; "Prometheus"; Zur Farbenlehre; Italienische Reise; Westöstlicher Diwan
Spouse Christiane Vulpius
(m. 1806; her death 1816)
Relatives Christian August Vulpius (brother-in-law)
Signature
Johann Wolfgang (von) Goethe (/ˈgɜː(r)tə/;[1][2][3] German: [ˈjoːhan ˈvɔlfɡaŋ ˈɡøːtə]; 28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and statesman. His body of work includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of metres and styles; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, more than 10,000 letters, and nearly 3,000 drawings by him exist.

A literary celebrity by the age of 25, Goethe was ennobled by the Duke of Saxe-Weimar, Karl August in 1782 after first taking up residence there in November 1775 following the success of his first novel, The Sorrows of Young Werther. He was an early participant in the Sturm und Drang literary movement. During his first ten years in Weimar, Goethe served as a member of the Duke's privy council, sat on the war and highway commissions, oversaw the reopening of silver mines in nearby Ilmenau, and impleme
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