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Bell Gallery presents ‘Walter Feldman: A Memorial Exhibition’⠀ ⠀ On display will be paintings, ...
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Bell Gallery presents ‘Walter Feldman: A Memorial Exhibition’⠀ ⠀ On display will be paintings, prints, drawings and books created over a span of 68 years by the late Brown professor and artist of wide-ranging interests. ( in bio) ⠀ ⠀ _________________⠀ ⠀ The David Winton Bell Gallery ... Bell Gallery presents ‘Walter Feldman: A Memorial Exhibition’⠀

On display will be paintings, prints, drawings and books created over a span of 68 years by the late Brown professor and artist of wide-ranging interests. (🔗 in bio) ⠀

_________________⠀

The David Winton Bell Gallery at Brown University will present “Walter Feldman: A Memorial Exhibition,” featuring a selection of works by the longtime Brown visual art professor, who died in 2017.⠀

The exhibition will be on view from Sept. 8 to Oct. 21, and art historian and critic Donald Kuspit will give a lecture on Feldman’s work at an opening reception on Friday, Sept. 14.⠀

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin, the Bell Gallery director, the exhibition begins with a painting Feldman completed in 1946, a macabre image of a skeleton-faced soldier made shortly after he returned from service as a U.S. Army infantryman during WW-II. That war is also referenced in the most recent painting in the exhibition, “Memorial X,” painted 68 years later in 2014.⠀

“War and the Holocaust cast a long shadow over Feldman’s work,” Conklin said. “However, between these two works, there are many more that testify to the joy that he found in family and nature, poetry and music, and teaching and the sustenance that his artistic practice provided.”⠀

Feldman served on the Brown faculty from 1953 until his retirement in 2007, teaching generations of students. Many of Feldman’s students stayed in touch with him, he said in a 2012 interview, because his approach, which was to always criticize with empathy, cultivated lasting relationships.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity⠀

🎨: "In the Name of King Phillip of Spain," an oil and collage on canvas piece from 1979, represents just one of the many mediums in which Feldman worked.
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Williams College awards honorary degree to President Paxson⠀ ⠀ Brown University President ...
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Williams College awards honorary degree to President Paxson⠀ ⠀ Brown University President Christina Paxson received an honorary doctor of laws from Williams College as she introduced former Brown dean Maud S. Mandel as the new Williams president. ( in bio)⠀ ⠀ _______________⠀ ⠀ In ... Williams College awards honorary degree to President Paxson⠀

Brown University President Christina Paxson received an honorary doctor of laws from Williams College as she introduced former Brown dean Maud S. Mandel as the new Williams president. (🔗 in bio)⠀

_______________⠀

In six years as Brown University’s 19th president, Christina Paxson has presented honorary degrees to a wide range of accomplished individuals. On Saturday, Sept. 8., she was on the receiving end instead, as Williams College awarded her an honorary doctor of laws.⠀

Michael R. Eisenson, chair of the Williams board of trustees, presented the degree to Paxson during an induction ceremony that formally welcomed Maud S. Mandel as the 18th president of Williams College. Mandel joined Williams in July after two decades on the Brown faculty and four years as dean of the college.⠀

Eisenson presented the degree to Paxson in recognition of what Williams College called a remarkable track record as a scholar and an academic leader at Princeton University and at Brown.⠀

“As president of Brown University, your impact has been sweeping,” said the honorary degree citation read aloud by Eisenson during the ceremony. “During your tenure, the University has advanced its teaching and research, fundamentally deepened student support and strengthened its role in the local community. Brown’s stature as a place of scholarship has never been higher.”⠀

Paxson, who delivered a welcome address during Mandel’s induction, said: “I am humbled and grateful to have been selected to receive an honorary degree from Williams College. I am very glad to be here on this magnificent campus as you inaugurate my colleague, my friend — and forever a friend of Brown University — Maud Mandel, to be your 18th president.”⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio)  #BrownUniversity @williamscollege
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Author and Brown alumna Madeline Miller writes mythology for the #MeToo era⠀ ⠀ Miller's latest ...
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Author and Brown alumna Madeline Miller writes mythology for the #MeToo era⠀ ⠀ Miller's latest novel gives the goddess and enchantress Circe a sympathetic and empowering new story. ( in bio)⠀ ⠀ __________________⠀ ⠀ When novelist Madeline Miller ’00, ’01 AM, first read Homer’s ... Author and Brown alumna Madeline Miller writes mythology for the #MeToo era⠀

Miller's latest novel gives the goddess and enchantress Circe a sympathetic and empowering new story. (🔗 in bio)⠀

__________________⠀

When novelist Madeline Miller ’00, ’01 AM, first read Homer’s "The Odyssey" in eighth grade, the story of the goddess and enchantress Circe left her incensed. She had expected a thrilling encounter between Circe and Odysseus.⠀

“I remember thinking, ‘Here’s Odysseus, the wily prince of Ithaca, and there’s going to be a real battle of wits between these two people,’” she says.⠀

Instead, the wandering hero draws his sword and threatens Circe. The goddess falls to the ground, begs for mercy, and invites Odysseus into her bed. “I remember this feeling of ‘That’s it? That’s all she gets?’” Miller says. “It felt like such a frustrating treatment of a fascinating character.” ⠀

That teenage frustration laid the foundations for her latest novel, "Circe," which weaves a new version of the story. Miller’s sympathetic, empowering narrative casts Circe as a mythological figure for the #MeToo moment—a woman often at the mercy of powerful men who has faced abuse and trauma and strives to define herself on her own terms. That journey begins in the halls of her father, the egotistical sun god Helios, where her burgeoning powers are grounds for banishment. Over the following millennia, the goddess encounters a string of ancient Greece’s iconic characters: the Minotaur, Daedalus and his doomed son Icarus, vengeful Athena, capricious Apollo, and, of course, Odysseus himself.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity @brownalumnimagazine
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Brown welcomes 53 new faculty members⠀ ⠀ Hailing from a wide variety of disciplines and backgrounds, 53 new faculty members join the Brown community this year to guide student-centered learning and engage in high-impact research. ( in bio) ⠀ ⠀ ________________⠀ ⠀ With research ... Brown welcomes 53 new faculty members⠀

Hailing from a wide variety of disciplines and backgrounds, 53 new faculty members join the Brown community this year to guide student-centered learning and engage in high-impact research. (🔗 in bio) ⠀

________________⠀

With research and teaching expertise in fields ranging from brain science and data science to Africana studies, epidemiology and engineering, 53 new professors and lecturers will join the Brown University faculty in the 2018-19 academic year.⠀

“Faculty are central to Brown’s core educational mission,” said Brown University Provost Richard M. Locke. “They are responsible for engaging in research and discovery across disciplines, finding solutions to pressing societal issues, and for designing innovative approaches to teaching and learning that prepare students to make a difference in the world. I’m enthusiastic about the exceptional scholars who are joining the Brown community this year and look forward to supporting their work in classrooms, laboratories and in the community.”⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity
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Brown’s new dean of the college on ‘learning how to learn’⠀ ⠀ With the 2018-19 academic year set ...
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Brown’s new dean of the college on ‘learning how to learn’⠀ ⠀ With the 2018-19 academic year set to begin next week, longtime faculty member and new dean of the college Rashid Zia '01 shared his insights on the Open Curriculum, undergraduate education and more.⠀ ⠀ __________________⠀ ⠀ After ... Brown’s new dean of the college on ‘learning how to learn’⠀

With the 2018-19 academic year set to begin next week, longtime faculty member and new dean of the college Rashid Zia '01 shared his insights on the Open Curriculum, undergraduate education and more.⠀

__________________⠀

After a dozen years on the Brown University faculty, Associate Professor of Engineering and Physics Rashid Zia took the helm as Brown’s new dean of the college on July 1, 2018.⠀

As the University’s senior undergraduate academic officer, Zia will oversee Brown’s student-centered Open Curriculum, academic advising, international student programs and classroom instruction, among other responsibilities.⠀

With classes for 2018-19 set to begin on Wednesday, Sept. 5, Zia — who is also a Class of 2001 alumnus of Brown — shared his insights on the Open Curriculum, undergraduate education and more with Brown Alumni Magazine. The Q&A will also run in BAM’s upcoming September/October issue.⠀

Q: Tell us about yourself. Where did you grow up and what was your path to Brown?⠀

I grew up in Rhode Island but was born in Iran days before the start of the Iran-Iraq war. Education was transformational in my life. My father was the first in his family to go to college, and he received a scholarship to come to America for graduate school. When the war broke out, my father’s education and close friends he made in school helped us build a new life here.⠀

When I first visited Brown, philosophy professor John Ladd spent an hour on the steps leading to College Street talking to me and my friend about the value of a liberal education. I knew then that Brown was right for me.⠀

I recall being inspired by classics professor Joe Pucci’s essay on learning through choice, which encouraged exploration of courses outside our initial interests. So I took one English class, then another, and enjoyed them so much that I pursued a combined A.B.-Sc.B. degree in English and engineering.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity @brownalumnimagazine
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Convocation 2018: Brown commences 255th academic year⠀ ⠀ As 2,693 undergraduate, graduate ...
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Convocation 2018: Brown commences 255th academic year⠀ ⠀ As 2,693 undergraduate, graduate and medical students launched their Brown academic careers, President Christina Paxson and Provost Richard Locke implored them to embrace the University's values and leverage opportunities ... Convocation 2018: Brown commences 255th academic year⠀

As 2,693 undergraduate, graduate and medical students launched their Brown academic careers, President Christina Paxson and Provost Richard Locke implored them to embrace the University's values and leverage opportunities to create positive social change. (🔗 in bio) ⠀

___________________⠀

To a soundtrack of bells tolling and bagpipes playing, Brown University’s 2,693 newest undergraduate, graduate and medical students processed through the Van Wickle Gates and along a path lined with cheering families and applauding faculty and staff on Tuesday, Sept. 4.⠀

After a short march across the Quiet Green, the students — who arrived in Providence from all corners of the globe and representing nearly every socioeconomic group, political persuasion, religious affiliation and cultural background — gathered on the College Green for the University’s 255th Opening Convocation, launching their Brown academic careers and formally opening the 2018-19 academic year.⠀

For the 1,657 first-year undergraduates who participated, the ceremonial opening culminated a weekend packed with introductory events, from residence hall move-ins and Orientation activities to family farewells, First Readings with new classmates and more.⠀

Presiding over her seventh Opening Convocation ceremony, University President Christina Paxson welcomed the incoming class with an urge to consider a phrase from Brown’s mission statement, which describes “a partnership of students and teachers in a unified community.” What does it mean to be unified in a time of visceral division, Paxson asked — especially considering the tremendous diversity of perspectives on campus? ⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #Brown2022 #BrownWelcome
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The University’s ceremonial Van Wickle Gates open for only two reasons: when new students enter campus to begin their studies and when new graduates depart for the world beyond Brown. Welcome to Brown! #Brown2022 #BrownWelcome The University’s ceremonial Van Wickle Gates open for only two reasons: when new students enter campus to begin their studies and when new graduates depart for the world beyond Brown.
Welcome to Brown! 🐻🎉 #Brown2022 #BrownWelcome
Welcome to Brown University, Class of 2022! ⠀ ⠀ First-year Brown students carry the Class of 2022 ...
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Welcome to Brown University, Class of 2022! ⠀ ⠀ First-year Brown students carry the Class of 2022 banner in the Convocation procession through the Van Wickle Gates and on to the College Green. ⠀ ⠀ #Brown2022 #BrownWelcome Welcome to Brown University, Class of 2022! ⠀

First-year Brown students carry the Class of 2022 banner in the Convocation procession through the Van Wickle Gates and on to the College Green. ⠀

📲 #Brown2022 #BrownWelcome 🐻🎉
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The University’s ceremonial Van Wickle Gates open for only two reasons: when new students enter campus to begin their studies and when new graduates depart for the world beyond Brown. ⠀ ⠀ Today at 4 p.m., Brown President Christina Paxson will welcome all first-year Brown students at the ... The University’s ceremonial Van Wickle Gates open for only two reasons: when new students enter campus to begin their studies and when new graduates depart for the world beyond Brown. ⠀

Today at 4 p.m., Brown President Christina Paxson will welcome all first-year Brown students at the University’s 255th Opening Convocation ceremony and then introduce this year’s keynote speaker: Richard M. Locke, provost and professor of political science and international and public affairs. ⠀

The ceremony will be live-streamed: brown.edu/web/livestream Join the conversation and share your photos, videos and messages with #Brown2022 and #BrownWelcome
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From move-in weekend to the Opening Convocation ceremony for new undergraduate, graduate and ...
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From move-in weekend to the Opening Convocation ceremony for new undergraduate, graduate and medical students, the Brown campus is bustling as the 2018-19 academic year gets underway. Share your photos, videos and messages with #Brown2022, #BrownMoveIn and #BrownWelcome From move-in weekend to the Opening Convocation ceremony for new undergraduate, graduate and medical students, the Brown campus is bustling as the 2018-19 academic year gets underway. 📲 Share your photos, videos and messages with #Brown2022, #BrownMoveIn and #BrownWelcome
"Families of the Class of 2022, it is my sincere pleasure to welcome you to Brown. I can remember arriving here 21 years ago with my parents but I'm guessing that in some ways our experiences may be similar. ⠀ ⠀ I remember driving up College Hill, passing the Van Wickle gates. Our family car ... "Families of the Class of 2022, it is my sincere pleasure to welcome you to Brown. I can remember arriving here 21 years ago with my parents but I'm guessing that in some ways our experiences may be similar. ⠀

I remember driving up College Hill, passing the Van Wickle gates. Our family car was stuffed with overflowing boxes, and overflowing emotions. Looking around each orientation, I smile as I see this tradition: students helping students, parents helping parents. Everyone getting settled in. ⠀

And indeed I'm sure you have begun to see just how important community and active participation are to us at Brown this weekend ... This tradition of taking an active role to help one another defines the Brown community." –Rashid Zia '01, dean of the college⠀

📲 Share your photos, videos and messages with #Brown2022 and #BrownWelcome ✈️🚚🐻🔑📦📚
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What better way to meet new classmates than a Midnight Organ Concert?! ⠀ ⠀ In this Brown tradition, University organist Mark Steinbach performs on Brown’s remarkable Hutchings – Votey pipe organ. Built in 1903, the organ is the largest of its type in the world, with over 300 pipes and ... What better way to meet new classmates than a Midnight Organ Concert?! 🎹🌙⠀

In this Brown tradition, University organist Mark Steinbach performs on Brown’s remarkable Hutchings – Votey pipe organ. Built in 1903, the organ is the largest of its type in the world, with over 300 pipes and more than 100 miles of wire. ⠀

📲 Share your photos, videos and messages with #Brown2022 and #BrownWelcome ✈️🚚🐻🔑📦📚
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Some words of wisdom for move-in weekend. Have any tips for your fellow Brunonians as they unpack? Leave a comment! ⠀ ⠀ Share your photos, videos and messages with #Brown2022 #BrownMoveIn and #BrownWelcome Some words of wisdom for move-in weekend. Have any tips for your fellow Brunonians as they unpack? Leave a comment! ⠀

📲 Share your photos, videos and messages with #Brown2022 #BrownMoveIn and #BrownWelcome ✈️🚚🐻🔑📦📚
The new school year buzz has arrived on College Hill, as returning students settle back in and new ...
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The new school year buzz has arrived on College Hill, as returning students settle back in and new students encounter academic life at Brown for the first time. Share your weekend with #Brown2022 #BrownMoveIn and #BrownWelcome The new school year buzz has arrived on College Hill, as returning students settle back in and new students encounter academic life at Brown for the first time. Share your weekend with #Brown2022 #BrownMoveIn and #BrownWelcome ✈️🚚🐻🔑📦📚
Students from the Third World Transition Program (TWTP) and the International Mentoring Program ...
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Students from the Third World Transition Program (TWTP) and the International Mentoring Program (IMP) welcome students to Brown. Add your photos, messages and videos with #Brown2022 and #BrownWelcome Students from the Third World Transition Program (TWTP) and the International Mentoring Program (IMP) welcome students to Brown. 📲 Add your photos, messages and videos with #Brown2022 and #BrownWelcome ✈️🚚🐻🔑📦📚
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Welcome to College Hill! ⠀ ⠀ From move-in weekend to Opening Convocation for new undergraduate, ...
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Welcome to College Hill! ⠀ ⠀ From move-in weekend to Opening Convocation for new undergraduate, graduate and medical students, the Brown campus is bustling as the 2018-19 academic year gets underway. ⠀ ⠀ Share your photos, videos and messages with #Brown2022 and #BrownWelcome Welcome to College Hill! ⠀

From move-in weekend to Opening Convocation for new undergraduate, graduate and medical students, the Brown campus is bustling as the 2018-19 academic year gets underway. ⠀

📲 Share your photos, videos and messages with #Brown2022 and #BrownWelcome
Brunonians take on the human trafficking crisis through legislation, healthcare and more⠀ ⠀ Students, ...
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Brunonians take on the human trafficking crisis through legislation, healthcare and more⠀ ⠀ Students, faculty and alumni at Brown are finding innovative ways to combat one of the greatest human rights abuses of our time. ( in bio)⠀ ⠀ ________________⠀ ⠀ According to the U.N.’s ... Brunonians take on the human trafficking crisis through legislation, healthcare and more⠀

Students, faculty and alumni at Brown are finding innovative ways to combat one of the greatest human rights abuses of our time. (🔗 in bio)⠀

________________⠀

According to the U.N.’s International Labor Office, over 40 million people worldwide have been victims of human trafficking, forced into providing labor and sex. The world’s fastest growing crime, trafficking generates billions in profit each year for its perpetrators—yet it remains a largely unseen enterprise. Trafficked humans might work in the factories that produce your favorite shoes or pick the vegetables that show up in your produce aisle. As the number of victims grows, Brown students, faculty, and alumni are tackling this invisible crime in unique ways.⠀

--- Training docs to spot clues ---⠀

A man named Rafi enters an emergency room with a deep cut in his arm. He gives the clerk his cousin’s address, tells her that he doesn’t have any health insurance and says he’s never been to a hospital before. His arm is anesthetized, he gets stitches, and he walks out with some gauze, a roll of tape, and ointment.⠀

That’s the scenario that physician Susie Baldwin laid out in a presentation last year for TEDMED, the health and medicine version of the TED conference. Yes, Rafi was properly treated for his injury. But, Baldwin continued, doctors failed to see what was really happening to Rafi, who had come to the U.S. for a construction job and was told that, despite working 19-hour days, he wouldn’t get paid until he cleared an $8,000 debt he didn’t even know he owed. ⠀

Hospitals are a prime area to connect trafficking victims to help. Studies have found that 28-50 percent of victims will encounter a health provider while being trafficked. But, according to Makini Chisolm-Straker ’05 MD ’09, an assistant professor at New York’s Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, clinicians are traditionally ill-equipped to identify and assist victims.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity
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College Hill welcomes #Brown2022⠀ ⠀ Thousands of new Class of 2022 undergraduates, graduate ...
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College Hill welcomes #Brown2022⠀ ⠀ Thousands of new Class of 2022 undergraduates, graduate students and medical students are about to begin their Brown University academic careers — and the campus is bustling with anticipation and activity. ( in bio)⠀ ⠀ ________________⠀ ⠀ The ... College Hill welcomes #Brown2022⠀

Thousands of new Class of 2022 undergraduates, graduate students and medical students are about to begin their Brown University academic careers — and the campus is bustling with anticipation and activity. (🔗 in bio)⠀

________________⠀

The new-school-year buzz begins at Brown well before the first classes begin. Beginning on Saturday, Sept. 1, first-year undergraduates will say farewell to family members and move into residence halls before heading to Orientation and taking part in the time-honored tradition of processing through the Van Wickle Gates during next week's Convocation ceremony.⠀

Returning students will reunite with friends who have spent the summer pursuing transformative experiences in Brown’s backyard and around the world. Many will also guide new students as Orientation facilitators, Meiklejohn peer advisors and resident counselors.⠀

On Tuesday, Sept. 4, at 4 p.m., Brown President Christina Paxson will welcome all first-year Brown students at the University’s 255th Opening Convocation ceremony and then introduce this year’s keynote speaker: Richard M. Locke, provost and professor of political science and international and public affairs. The ceremony will be live-streamed via the web. Join the conversation and share your photos, videos and messages with #Brown2022 and #BrownWelcome.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity
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Child lead exposure study finds substantial reductions possible⠀ ⠀ Intervention by researchers ...
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Child lead exposure study finds substantial reductions possible⠀ ⠀ Intervention by researchers reduced household lead below levels previously deemed achievable and reduced blood lead concentrations in more highly exposed children, though the decrease did not result in significant ... Child lead exposure study finds substantial reductions possible⠀

Intervention by researchers reduced household lead below levels previously deemed achievable and reduced blood lead concentrations in more highly exposed children, though the decrease did not result in significant neurobehavioral improvements in children. (🔗 in bio)⠀

_________________⠀

New data from a long-term study of 355 mothers and their children found that fixing peeling paint and removing other household sources of lead during the mother’s pregnancy can reduce levels of dust lead in homes to levels significantly lower than previously deemed achievable.⠀

“There is no safe level of lead,” said Joseph Braun, associate professor of epidemiology at Brown University’s School of Public Health and lead author on the study. “We were able to achieve dust lead levels considerably lower than the current EPA standards for lead remediation and at levels where far fewer children are at risk of being lead-poisoned in their homes.”⠀

The JAMA Pediatrics paper, published today, was part of the Health Outcomes and Measures of the Environment (HOME) study in Cincinnati, Ohio, which followed a group of mothers and their children from the city since pregnancy, beginning in 2003.⠀

To conduct the randomized study, the research team visited the homes of 174 pregnant women to specifically address the lead hazards present in each residence. Measures included repairing and repainting peeling lead-based paint, replacing windows with lead-based paint, installing window trough liners, installing tap-water filters for drinking water, and covering bare lead-contaminated soil with groundcover. ⠀

Read more at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #lead #drinkingwater #Cincinnati #leadpaint
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Former RNC chair Michael Steele to join Brown’s Watson Institute⠀ ⠀ As a faculty fellow, the conservative ...
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Former RNC chair Michael Steele to join Brown’s Watson Institute⠀ ⠀ As a faculty fellow, the conservative political commentator and former chair of the Republican National Committee will lead a seminar on American politics and cohost two public events focused on the midterm elections. ... Former RNC chair Michael Steele to join Brown’s Watson Institute⠀

As a faculty fellow, the conservative political commentator and former chair of the Republican National Committee will lead a seminar on American politics and cohost two public events focused on the midterm elections. (🔗 in bio)⠀

_________________⠀

Michael Steele, a conservative political commentator and former chair of the Republican National Committee, has been named a faculty fellow at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs.⠀

As a fellow, Steele — an author and the former lieutenant governor of Maryland — will draw on his extensive on-the-ground experience to help students apply theory to real world challenges, Watson officials said. And in two public events that he will co-host with Tom Perez, a Brown alumnus and current Democratic National Committee chair, he will provide commentary and analysis on the upcoming 2018 midterm elections.⠀

“Michael Steele has had an extraordinary and ongoing career spanning law, business, politics, public service and journalism,” said Edward Steinfeld, director of the Watson Institute. “As everyone knows who has read his work and seen him on television, he is deeply insightful about politics and public affairs. Moreover, he is committed to open, respectful and spirited dialogue across the political spectrum.”⠀

Steele’s not-for-credit study group, titled “The Dismantling and Rebranding of American Politics,” will be similar in structure to seminars led by Perez last spring and fall — yet with a view from the other side of the aisle. Over five sessions this fall, Steele’s seminar will examine the methods used by political parties to win elections and how the current political moment is transforming — and potentially signaling the demise of — the Republican and Democratic political parties, according to Steele. ⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity @watsoninstitute
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Brown scientist explores the nexus between appetite and psychology⠀ ⠀ In her latest book "Why ...
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Brown scientist explores the nexus between appetite and psychology⠀ ⠀ In her latest book "Why You Eat What You Eat," Rachel Herz investigates how everything from our environment to our mood impacts what goes on in our mouths. ( in bio)⠀ ⠀ _________________⠀ ⠀ Rachel Herz, an adjunct ... Brown scientist explores the nexus between appetite and psychology⠀

In her latest book "Why You Eat What You Eat," Rachel Herz investigates how everything from our environment to our mood impacts what goes on in our mouths. (🔗 in bio)⠀

_________________⠀

Rachel Herz, an adjunct assistant professor in Brown’s Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, arrives at an East Greenwich, Rhode Island, café feeling stressed. She’d lost a document when her computer crashed and she isn’t sure how to retrieve it. “If I were an emotional eater, I’d be running to get a huge slice of cheesecake,” she says with a laugh. ⠀

We’re not eating, in fact. We’re just catching up over a coffee—Herz was my professor at Brown—to discuss her book "Why You Eat What You Eat," published last year by Norton. (Disclosure: I blurbed it.) Yet if we were eating, Herz notes, we would not be in a good environment: the music’s too loud, the café too dark, and we’re competing with surrounding conversations, plus the hiss of the cappuccino machine. “We’re so bombarded,” she says.⠀

But these stimuli—sights, sounds, smells, emotions—have a huge, often unnoticed, influence on how we experience the world. Particularly on food, how we taste it, and how it makes us feel. And that is exactly where her new book focuses: at that nexus between appetite and psychology. In its pages, she unpacks how (and why) all of our senses influence our experience of food and our motivations to eat. She investigates how our minds and our environment change our perception of flavor. And she also tackles the reverse: how our experience of food and eating changes our own physiology, mood, and behavior. ⠀

Read more at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #EverTrue @brownalumnimagazine
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In elementary school, Emily Nemens ’05 would gather friends in her Seattle backyard for an activity ...
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In elementary school, Emily Nemens ’05 would gather friends in her Seattle backyard for an activity she called “Emily’s Writing Club.” While her older sister and a dog frolicked nearby, “I just wanted to sit down in a circle and write stories and draw pictures,” she says. ⠀ ⠀ On June 1, Nemens ... In elementary school, Emily Nemens ’05 would gather friends in her Seattle backyard for an activity she called “Emily’s Writing Club.” While her older sister and a dog frolicked nearby, “I just wanted to sit down in a circle and write stories and draw pictures,” she says. ⠀

On June 1, Nemens took charge of a more sophisticated writing club as editor of the Paris Review, which has a venerable history and considerable literary clout. Launched in 1953, it was led for a half-century by one of its founders, George Plimpton, and helped spark the careers of writers including Ann Patchett and Jonathan Franzen. Last December, Lorin Stein stepped down as editor after apologizing for inappropriate behavior toward female staffers and contributors. ⠀

Nemens, 35, a writer and illustrator with an MFA in creative writing from Louisiana State University, has served as coeditor and prose editor of The Southern Review, another literary journal, since 2013. But her appointment to her new post surprised the New York literati. “I was on nobody’s radar,” she says. ⠀

The daughter of a retired nurse and a city planner, Nemens says her parents were “very supportive of the arts, but a little perplexed by my commitment to pursue them.” At Brown, she concentrated in art history and studio art, but also took literature and creative writing courses. She remembers failing an entrance quiz for an oversubscribed poetry workshop taught by the late Michael S. Harper, known for his jazz-inspired verse. Undeterred, she drew on her experience as a jazz saxophonist to talk her way in.⠀

Four days after graduation, she began work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on a fellowship in the education department. For a later job, at the Center for Architecture, she used both her artistic and editing skills. She also worked as a freelance graphic designer, writer, and researcher in New York. ⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #EverTrue @brownalumnimagazine 📷: Jeremiah Ariaz
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Brown anthropologist earns grant to develop new archaeological survey technology⠀ ⠀ Parker ...
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Brown anthropologist earns grant to develop new archaeological survey technology⠀ ⠀ Parker VanValkenburgh’s digital platform will study how the mass resettlement of indigenous Andean peoples by the Spanish Empire impacted Peru’s social and political landscape. ( in bio)⠀ ⠀ _____________⠀ ⠀ The ... Brown anthropologist earns grant to develop new archaeological survey technology⠀

Parker VanValkenburgh’s digital platform will study how the mass resettlement of indigenous Andean peoples by the Spanish Empire impacted Peru’s social and political landscape. (🔗 in bio)⠀

_____________⠀

The American Council of Learned Societies has awarded Brown University Assistant Professor of Anthropology Parker VanValkenburgh and colleagues a $150,000 grant to develop a digital platform for archaeological survey in the Andes.⠀

With Steven Wernke, associate professor of anthropology at Vanderbilt University, VanValkenburgh is developing the Geospatial Platform for Andean Culture, History and Archaeology (GeoPACHA). GeoPACHA will connect satellite imagery from a variety of sources, as well as photos from historic aerial surveys, to build a detailed inventory of archaeological remains in the Andes — including many that have not been discovered yet.⠀

The platform will enable a broader understanding of Andean culture over a large area, VanValkenburgh said.⠀

“The project began with a particular problem in mind,” he said. “Namely, to understand how the Spanish viceroyalty’s forced resettlement of at least 1.4 million indigenous people in the 1570s transformed the social and political landscapes of Peru.”⠀

Many researchers have conducted studies on individual resettlement sites, called reducciones, or small regions including several reducciones, VanValkenburgh said, but there is little sense of the overall resettlement program’s collective impact.⠀

The tool will provide a broad regional view of the impact on the landscape of the mass involuntary migration and might be useful for mapping other kinds of sites, including elements of Inka imperial infrastructure.⠀

“We set about trying to put as many reducciones on a map as we could, based in part on scattered textual descriptions of their locations in three extant census documents,” VanValkenburgh said.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #Anthropology #Peru
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Marcos Rodriguez: Analyzing forest growth ⠀ ⠀ For the ecology and evolutionary biology concentrator, ...
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Marcos Rodriguez: Analyzing forest growth ⠀ ⠀ For the ecology and evolutionary biology concentrator, a summer spent in a Massachusetts forest offered the chance to explore forest ecology and a future career in research. ( in bio)⠀ ⠀ _______________⠀ ⠀ Marcos Rodriguez has always ... Marcos Rodriguez: Analyzing forest growth ⠀

For the ecology and evolutionary biology concentrator, a summer spent in a Massachusetts forest offered the chance to explore forest ecology and a future career in research. (🔗 in bio)⠀

_______________⠀

Marcos Rodriguez has always loved natural history museums and zoos. ⠀

“I never grew out of the dinosaur and animal phase,” the rising Brown University junior from El Paso, Texas said. “I just became more interested in life processes and the science behind them.”⠀

This passion for understanding how living things interact and change naturally led him to Brown’s program in biology with a concentration in ecology and evolutionary biology. ⠀

During his first semester on campus, Rodriguez said, he completed a course with Jim Kellner, an assistant professor of environmental studies affiliated with the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society. Rodriguez was interested in doing research over the summer — Kellner recommended the National Science Foundation’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program, which supports summer research in many disciplines and offers students a stipend. ⠀

Through REU, Rodriguez found out about the Harvard Forest summer research program and was intrigued by its focus on theoretical models explaining forest structure. Current mathematical models explaining how forests grow and the amount of energy they produce are based on data from larger trees, but smaller trees don’t get as much light, so their growth rate and energy patterns might not match these models.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #BrownSummerExperiences #BrownResearch #Forests #Massachusetts
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Researchers discover exposed ice deposits on Moon’s surface⠀ ⠀ The deposits, found near the ...
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Researchers discover exposed ice deposits on Moon’s surface⠀ ⠀ The deposits, found near the Moon’s north and south poles, could be a potential resource for future lunar exploration. ( in bio)⠀ ⠀ 🌒🌒🌒🌒🌒🌒⠀ ⠀ Researchers have made the first definitive detection of water ice exposed ... Researchers discover exposed ice deposits on Moon’s surface⠀

The deposits, found near the Moon’s north and south poles, could be a potential resource for future lunar exploration. (🔗 in bio)⠀

🌒🌒🌒🌒🌒🌒⠀

Researchers have made the first definitive detection of water ice exposed at the uppermost surface of the Moon. The deposits, found near the lunar poles, are hidden away on crater floors and other areas that are permanently shadowed from direct sunlight.⠀

Depending upon how much ice is there, the researchers say, the deposits could be a resource for future lunar exploration.⠀

The research, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was led by Shuai Li, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa who earned his Ph.D. from and worked previously as a postdoctoral researcher at Brown University. The detection was made using data primarily from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3), an imaging spectrometer launched in 2008 aboard India’s Chandryaan-1 spacecraft.⠀

“This was a really surprising finding,” Li said. “While I was interested to see what I could find in the M3 data from [permanently shadowed regions], I did not have any hope to see ice features when I started this project. I was astounded when I looked closer and found such meaningful spectral features in the measurements.”⠀

The M3 data were bolstered by data from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), the Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), and the Diviner instrument onboard America’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission.⠀

“It had previously been hypothesized that water ice may be stable in permanently shadowed regions of the lunar surface,” said Ralph Milliken, an associate professor in Brown’s Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences and a study co-author. ⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #Moon
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Shining a light on the film industry race gap⠀ ⠀ How Brickson Diamond ’93 blazed a trail for Black ...
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Shining a light on the film industry race gap⠀ ⠀ How Brickson Diamond ’93 blazed a trail for Black creatives and audiences at Sundance – and beyond.⠀ ⠀ /////////////⠀ ⠀ In 2007, only seven films by Black artists were shown at the Sundance Film Festival. Brickson Diamond ’93, attending ... Shining a light on the film industry race gap⠀

How Brickson Diamond ’93 blazed a trail for Black creatives and audiences at Sundance – and beyond.⠀

/////////////⠀

In 2007, only seven films by Black artists were shown at the Sundance Film Festival. Brickson Diamond ’93, attending with friends and seeing very few other Black faces, described it this way: “Sundance was not an obvious place for Black filmmakers to go.” ⠀

But the Brown trustee, former investment management executive, Harvard MBA, and former COO of the Executive Leadership Council was “struck by the power of films—the stories they told and the impact they could have.” So he and two friends co-founded the nonprofit Blackhouse Foundation, a dedicated space at Sundance for networking, education, and discussions designed to open the festival’s doors for Black artists and audiences.⠀

“At first it was aficionados of film who came; then Black filmmakers submitted entries to the festival—and their films got in, went on to be sold, win Oscars, and build careers,” Diamond says. Under his leadership, Blackhouse has expanded to the Tribeca Film Festival, the LA Film Festival, the Toronto International Film Festival, and AFI Fest. ⠀

And Sundance this year? A record 39 projects by Black artists (including film, episodic, and virtual reality) were shown at the festival.⠀

Now he’s returning to many of the career areas he’s worked in before—but with a twist. As CEO of the recently launched Big Answers, LLC, “I want to leverage Black talent into senior roles in entertainment, tech, and alternative asset-management. I want to answer the question, ‘How do you get more people of color and members of the LGBTQ community into those rooms?’”⠀

Wondering how such a self-starter came to be, we asked Diamond about his upbringing, his career path, and the strategies that helped him succeed in his multiple roles.⠀

Continue reading at brunonia.brown.edu / #BrownTogether / #BrownUniversity (🔗 in bio)
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Non-binary Brown alumni discuss life beyond the bounds of gender⠀ ⠀ Kate Bornstein and Dréya ...
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Non-binary Brown alumni discuss life beyond the bounds of gender⠀ ⠀ Kate Bornstein and Dréya St. Clair, Brown graduates from two different generations, share what it was like to find their non-binary selves on College Hill. ( in bio) ⠀ ⠀ _________________⠀ ⠀ She wears the moniker ... Non-binary Brown alumni discuss life beyond the bounds of gender⠀

Kate Bornstein and Dréya St. Clair, Brown graduates from two different generations, share what it was like to find their non-binary selves on College Hill. (🔗 in bio) ⠀

_________________⠀

She wears the moniker reluctantly, but performer, playwright, author, and activist Kate Bornstein ’69 is a bona fide gender-nonconforming icon, at least as far back as her seminal 1994 book, "Gender Outlaw," which — years before Chaz Bono, Laverne Cox, Chelsea Manning, and Caitlyn Jenner became household names — imagined gender identities that did not fall neatly into the societal binaries of male or female. More books followed, including "Hello, Cruel World;" "A Queer and Pleasant Danger;" and "My Gender Workbook."⠀

This spring, Bornstein turned over a lifetime of papers to the John Hay and Pembroke Center archives (“A huge get for us!” says Pembroke archivist Mary Murphy, who adds that Bornstein turned down a request from a library at Harvard), and she started preparing for her role on Broadway this summer in "Straight White Men," which Young Jean Lee developed while a playwright in residence at Brown. Bornstein took time out one Sunday afternoon to open up her East Harlem apartment (where she lives with her wife — author and sexologist Barbara Carrellas — two cats, and a pug dog) to BAM.⠀

We were joined by Dréya St. Clair ’05, an actor, artist, and development officer at the New York City think tank Demos who shares with Bornstein the experience of further discovering her gender-nonbinary identity while at Brown. That’s not all they have in common: St. Clair actually lived in the apartment above Bornstein and Carrellas her first two years out of Brown before getting her MFA at CalArts. Like many younger trans and gender-nonconforming folks, St. Clair calls Bornstein “Auntie Kate.”⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #EverTrue #nonbinary @brownalumnimagazine #gender
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Stories from the past / Solutions for the present⠀ ⠀ Alumni conversations about diversity and ...
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Stories from the past / Solutions for the present⠀ ⠀ Alumni conversations about diversity and inclusion at Brown: in history, and in progress.⠀ ⠀ ////////////////⠀ ⠀ In anticipation of the 2018 Black Alumni Reunion, alumni of color from varied decades and backgrounds were invited ... Stories from the past / Solutions for the present⠀

Alumni conversations about diversity and inclusion at Brown: in history, and in progress.⠀

////////////////⠀

In anticipation of the 2018 Black Alumni Reunion, alumni of color from varied decades and backgrounds were invited to share memories from their time at Brown, reflect on changes over the past 50 years, and talk about the University’s progress on advancing diversity and inclusion. With a nod to the “StoryCorps” program, two alumni were asked to have a conversation around these questions. The result? A lively exchange of insights and experiences.⠀

This series was launched with a conversation between Sheryl Brissett Chapman ’71, a leader of the 1968 Black Student Walkout, and Suzanne Rivera ’91, co-founder of Students on Financial Aid. Both Sheryl and Suzanne have been active volunteers with Brown in the years since graduation.⠀

In the second Stories / Solutions episode, Tony Teat ’88 and Tho Phan ’11 (pictured) compare their years at Brown and reflect on the progress made by the University over the past half-century, such as the Pathways to Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan (DIAP), released by President Paxson in 2016. Their contrasting experiences included, on the one hand, the 1985 student occupation of the John Carter Brown Library, and on the other, the latter part of President Emerita Ruth J. Simmons’ pathbreaking 11-year term.⠀

/////////⠀

Fifty years after the Black Student Walkout of 1968, Brown University and the Inman Page Black Alumni Council (IPC) invite alumni from across the generations back to campus this September 21-23 for the 2018 Black Alumni Reunion. Attendees and speakers (including former Brown president Ruth Simmons) will reflect on the past, discuss solutions for the present, and propel Brown into the future. #BrownBAR18 #BrownAlumni (🔗 in bio)
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Brown University physics professor S. James Gates Jr. has been elected to the presidential line ...
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Brown University physics professor S. James Gates Jr. has been elected to the presidential line of the American Physical Society, a nonprofit that represents more than 55,000 physicists in higher education, national laboratories and industry in the U.S. and across the world.⠀ ⠀ Gates ... Brown University physics professor S. James Gates Jr. has been elected to the presidential line of the American Physical Society, a nonprofit that represents more than 55,000 physicists in higher education, national laboratories and industry in the U.S. and across the world.⠀

Gates will serve as the society’s vice president in 2019, president-elect in 2020 and president in 2021. The APS president leads the society’s board of directors, which has the ultimate responsibility for the actions of the society. The society’s mission is to advance and diffuse the knowledge of physics through its research journals, scientific meetings, and education, outreach, advocacy and international activities.⠀

Gates says he’s honored to have been elected by his fellow physicists and that he sees this as a critical time to be taking on this new role.⠀

“Now is a time when all good citizens need to come to the aid of our nation’s future,” he said. “This can be done best, in my opinion, by providing service to the mission of rededicating efforts to the bridging of chasms that have appeared in our nation. Some of these exist between portions of the public and the science community, and we must not let these deleterious processes go unchallenged.”⠀

Gates joined the Brown faculty as the Ford Foundation Professor of Physics in May 2017, after 33 years on the faculty at the University of Maryland. He is known for pioneering work in theoretical physics, including the areas of supersymmetry and supergravity. Gates has earned numerous awards during his academic career including the National Medal of Science, the highest honor bestowed upon American scientists and engineers by the U.S. president. He’s a member of the National Academy of Sciences, serves on the board of trustees of Society for Science and the Public and was a member of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology under Barack Obama.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #Physics #
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Undergraduate team helps to develop drone-based intro robotics course⠀ ⠀ With the help of a Brown ...
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Undergraduate team helps to develop drone-based intro robotics course⠀ ⠀ With the help of a Brown summer research grant, a team of undergraduates is helping to develop a course that uses simple drones as a gateway into autonomous robotics. ( in bio) ⠀ ⠀ ______________________⠀ ⠀ The ... Undergraduate team helps to develop drone-based intro robotics course⠀

With the help of a Brown summer research grant, a team of undergraduates is helping to develop a course that uses simple drones as a gateway into autonomous robotics. (🔗 in bio) ⠀

______________________⠀

The eighth floor of Brown’s Sciences Library, home of the Humanity Centered Robotics Initiative labs, is buzzing this summer.⠀

There’s the figurative buzz of students working feverishly on summer research projects. But there’s also a literal buzz, generated by small quadcopter drones conspicuously hovering in the hallways.⠀

The drones belong to a team of undergraduates who have spent the summer working to refine an introductory robotics course taught by Stefanie Tellex, an assistant professor of computer science. The class teaches students to assemble their own quadcopter drones from kits funded by Amazon, and then program them to fly on their own. The idea, said Tellex, is to use the drone as a fun and inexpensive platform for teaching basic concepts in robotics — from the complexities of integrating hardware and software to the potential problems that arise when programming autonomous machines.⠀

Tellex tasked the student team — rising sophomores Luke Eller, Theo Guerin, Garrett Warren and Sophie Yang — with improving the drones and enhancing the concepts students will learn when they take the class in the fall. The team worked under the auspices of a Karen T. Romer Undergraduate Teaching and Research Award (UTRA), which provides students with funding to stay on campus and work on research projects over the summer.⠀

“Last year was the first time that course ran, and we inherited that stack of software and the drone design used last year,” Eller said. “Our job is to improve that software, extend the capabilities of the drone and rework the course based on feedback from the students who took the class last year.”⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #drones #robotics #computerscience
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Brown alumnus helps those with Parkinson's master the dance floor⠀ ⠀ David Leventhal, a 1995 ...
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Brown alumnus helps those with Parkinson's master the dance floor⠀ ⠀ David Leventhal, a 1995 graduate, helps people living with Parkinson's disease manage their symptoms through dance.⠀ ⠀ _______________⠀ ⠀ After the renowned Mark Morris Dance Group opened a Brooklyn center ... Brown alumnus helps those with Parkinson's master the dance floor⠀

David Leventhal, a 1995 graduate, helps people living with Parkinson's disease manage their symptoms through dance.⠀

_______________⠀

After the renowned Mark Morris Dance Group opened a Brooklyn center in 2001, dancer David Leventhal ’95 stepped in to launch its Dance for PD, a program that offers classes free of charge for people with Parkinson’s disease. ⠀

He’d taught plenty of students before — but this time, he says, was different. Inside the studio he faced patients in their 60s and 70s, eager to see if dance could help manage their symptoms, which can include tremors, rigidity, and difficulty standing or walking. “They came in with such a hunger to learn and think about movement differently,” says Leventhal, now the program’s director. “It was the most satisfying teaching I’d ever done.” ⠀

Today Dance for PD serves more than 500 folks each week in nine New York City locations. Through artistic partnerships, classes are also held in more than 250 communities throughout the U.S. and in 24 countries. Each class fuses steps from modern dance, tap and ballet, moving from seated warm-up exercises to routines from "West Side Story" or "Swan Lake." Leventhal says the only difference between this and an ordinary dance class is that the pace occasionally slows and choreography is shortened. “We don’t water down our approach,” he says. “It’s artistically and technically rigorous.” ⠀

The program began when a local Parkinson’s support group approached the Mark Morris Dance Group about creating a class for its members. Leventhal says the medical community was skeptical at first. But since then dozens of research studies have pointed to the benefits of dance for those with the disease, with improvements in balance, gait, motor skills, and overall quality of life. Now most participants are actually referred by clinicians. ⠀

Continue reading (🔗 in bio) ⠀
📷: Joanne Rathe / The Boston Globe ⠀
#BrownUniversity | @brownalumnimagazine | #Parkinsons
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Jennifer Hunter to lead diversity and inclusion efforts within Brown Athletics⠀ ⠀ Hunter, the ...
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Jennifer Hunter to lead diversity and inclusion efforts within Brown Athletics⠀ ⠀ Hunter, the University’s first associate director of athletics for diversity and inclusion initiatives, will develop and implement programs focused on Brown athletics and student-athletes.⠀ ⠀ ________________⠀ ⠀ Jennifer ... Jennifer Hunter to lead diversity and inclusion efforts within Brown Athletics⠀

Hunter, the University’s first associate director of athletics for diversity and inclusion initiatives, will develop and implement programs focused on Brown athletics and student-athletes.⠀

________________⠀

Jennifer Hunter has been named Brown Athletics’ first-ever associate director of athletics for diversity and inclusion initiatives. She will begin her new position on College Hill on August 30. ⠀ ⠀
“Jennifer rose to the top of a very strong pool of candidates,” said Eric Estes, Brown’s vice president for campus life and student services at Brown University who was co-chair of the search committee. “She brings a wide range of experience from big-picture strategic thinking and planning to day-to-day support of students and staff. She also understands how athletics and inclusive community support the core academic mission. We are thrilled that she will be joining the Brown community.” ⠀

Guided by Brown Athletics’ departmental diversity and inclusion action plan, Hunter will lead the development and implementation of diversity and inclusion programs and workshops; advise on best practices related to searching, hiring, onboarding and retention of staff; and support student athletes, staff and coaches on community building. ⠀

“We are extremely pleased to welcome Jennifer Hunter to our leadership team at Brown,” said Jack Hayes, Brown’s director of athletics. “In her role, Jennifer will enable Brown Athletics to distinguish itself as a department that values community and supports an inclusive environment for all student-athletes and staff.”⠀ ⠀
Hunter brings a rich professional background of athletics, higher education, secondary education and business development.⠀

Before Brown, Hunter was director of diversity, inclusion and engagement at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Division of Intercollegiate Athletics. In addition to overseeing diversity and inclusion initiatives for the division, she provided senior administration with leadership, guidance and counseling on internal and external issues and concerns. ⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownU
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First study on physical properties of giant cancer cells may inform new treatments⠀ ⠀ Giant cancer ...
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First study on physical properties of giant cancer cells may inform new treatments⠀ ⠀ Giant cancer cells are much larger and stiffer than other cancer cells and move further, study shows.⠀ ⠀ ____________________⠀ ⠀ Polyploidal cancer cells—cells that have more than two copies ... First study on physical properties of giant cancer cells may inform new treatments⠀

Giant cancer cells are much larger and stiffer than other cancer cells and move further, study shows.⠀

____________________⠀

Polyploidal cancer cells—cells that have more than two copies of each chromosome—are much larger than most other cancer cells, are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation treatments and are associated with disease relapse. A new study by Brown University researchers is the first to reveal key physical properties of these “giant” cancer cells. ⠀

The research, published Aug. 9 in Scientific Reports, shows that the giant cells are stiffer and have the ability to move further than other cancer cells, which could help explain why they’re associated with more serious disease.⠀

“I think these polyploidal giant cancer cells are the missing link for why tumors become so complex and heterogeneous so quickly,” said Michelle Dawson, an assistant professor of molecular pharmacology, physiology and biotechnology at Brown and the study’s corresponding author. “By understanding the physical properties of this weird population of cells we might identify a new way to eliminate them. Patients will benefit from that.”⠀

Dawson, who is also an assistant professor of engineering with an appointment in Brown’s Center for Biomedical Engineering, worked with graduate student Botai Xuan and two undergraduate students on the study, which focused on a common strain of triple negative breast cancer, an extremely aggressive and hard-to-eradicate kind of breast cancer.⠀

They found that 2-5 percent of cells from this breast cancer strain were polyploidal giant cancer cells with four, eight or sixteen copies of each chromosome, instead of the normal two. The cells with more chromosomes were proportionally larger, which is similar to polyploidal cells in other organisms. Commercially available strawberries, for example, tend to be much larger than wild strawberries because the cells of commercial varieties have eight copies of each chromosome. ⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #cancer #cancercells #BrownResearch #breastcancer
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The Brown University application for the Class of 2023 is now available. ⠀ ⠀ All first-year applicants are required to complete the Common Application and Brown Member section online. Please visit Brown's Undergraduate Admission webpage for details on the application process. ( ... The Brown University application for the Class of 2023 is now available. ⠀

All first-year applicants are required to complete the Common Application and Brown Member section online. Please visit Brown's Undergraduate Admission webpage for details on the application process. (🔗 in bio) #BrownBecause
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NEH grant will fund excavation of ancient Maya citadels by Brown researcher, colleagues⠀ ⠀ Brown ...
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NEH grant will fund excavation of ancient Maya citadels by Brown researcher, colleagues⠀ ⠀ Brown professor Stephen Houston will excavate a massive series of citadels in present-day Guatemala, which can shed light on how the leaders of the ancient Maya city of Tikal responded to a foreign ... NEH grant will fund excavation of ancient Maya citadels by Brown researcher, colleagues⠀

Brown professor Stephen Houston will excavate a massive series of citadels in present-day Guatemala, which can shed light on how the leaders of the ancient Maya city of Tikal responded to a foreign threat. (🔗 in bio) ⠀

_________________⠀

Stephen Houston, professor of social science and anthropology at Brown, has won a $200,000 collaborative research grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the organization announced on Wednesday, Aug. 8.⠀

Houston, with project co-director Thomas Garrison of Ithaca College, will begin work on “Citadels and Surveillance: State Defense at the Classic Maya Fortresses of La Cuernavilla” in the spring of 2019. The project will investigate the significance of a system of citadels at the western entrance of the ancient Maya city of Tikal in present-day Guatemala.⠀

“A recent survey of the area surrounding Tikal lay bare a sprawling chain of hilltop fortresses, deep embankments, guarded palaces and possible garrison facilities,” Houston said. “This system, among the largest ever found in the New World, expresses the fears of the time and the impact of a foreign city — the Mexican metropolis of Teotihuacan.”⠀

Houston and his team will excavate the citadels to evaluate how they were used, test for evidence of the Teotihuacan presence, and ascertain whether the structures and alterations to the landscape date to the arrival of a foreign invader known as “Born from Fire.” References to Born from Fire have been found in glyphic texts and sacred imagery, and the threat he represented may have triggered the large-scale defenses in Tikal. The NEH grant will enable Houston to evaluate whether the fortifications were built as a comprehensive set of defenses against a particular enemy or, alternatively, on an ad hoc basis as various threats arose.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #guatamala #NEH #Mayan #Tikal
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For the past two decades, the renowned physicist S. James Gates Jr. has hosted a summer research ...
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For the past two decades, the renowned physicist S. James Gates Jr. has hosted a summer research workshop that gives undergraduate students from around country a chance to work side-by-side with him on some of the biggest questions in theoretical physics. ⠀ ⠀ This year’s edition was the ... For the past two decades, the renowned physicist S. James Gates Jr. has hosted a summer research workshop that gives undergraduate students from around country a chance to work side-by-side with him on some of the biggest questions in theoretical physics. ⠀

This year’s edition was the first to take place at Brown, following the National Medal of Science winner’s appointment to the Brown faculty in 2017. The goal is for students to eventually be co-authors with Gates on peer-reviewed journal papers — a major leg up for those thinking about graduate school. #SceneatBrown #BrownUniversity
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Despite ACA, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults still have trouble affording health care⠀ ⠀ Though ...
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Despite ACA, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults still have trouble affording health care⠀ ⠀ Though rates of insurance since the Affordable Care Act's implementation are similar, LGB individuals avoid or delay medical treatment more frequently than their straight peers due to cost. ... Despite ACA, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults still have trouble affording health care⠀

Though rates of insurance since the Affordable Care Act's implementation are similar, LGB individuals avoid or delay medical treatment more frequently than their straight peers due to cost. (🔗 in bio)⠀

_______________⠀

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), commonly known as Obamacare, has reduced the number of Americans without health insurance from 18 percent to about 13 percent, statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show.⠀

And though the exact percentage of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) adults with health insurance prior to the launch of the ACA isn’t known precisely, a new study reports that they are now insured at the same rate as their straight peers. However, they are still more likely to avoid necessary medical treatment due to cost.⠀

“I started looking at this question because I had read a few studies indicating that following the ACA’s implementation in 2014 and the legalization of same-sex marriage in 2015, there were comparable rates of uninsurance for LGB adults,” said Kevin Nguyen, lead author of the Aug. 6 study in the August issue of Health Affairs. “However, insurance is only one step in receiving care — I was curious to see if there were other differences in the access to care and health outcomes.”⠀

Nguyen is a doctoral student at the Brown University School of Public Health. Dr. Amal N. Trivedi, an associate professor of health services, policy and practice, and an associate professor of medicine at Brown, and Theresa I. Shireman, a professor of health services, policy and practice at Brown, were co-authors on the study.⠀

The researchers analyzed three publically available data sets from the CDC spanning from 2014-15 — the first year the survey asked about sexual orientation — to 2016-17, the most current data set. The study included about 330,000 adults between ages 18 and 64, 4.3 percent of whom identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #AffordableCareAct #LGB #PublicHealth #HealthCare
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Catherine Campo: Educating through performance⠀ ⠀ As an intern at CNBC’s “Mad Money,” the Brown ...
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Catherine Campo: Educating through performance⠀ ⠀ As an intern at CNBC’s “Mad Money,” the Brown theatre and performance studies concentrator is helping viewers improve their financial lives.⠀ ⠀ __________________⠀ ⠀ At the end of her first day as a summer intern at CNBC in Englewood ... Catherine Campo: Educating through performance⠀

As an intern at CNBC’s “Mad Money,” the Brown theatre and performance studies concentrator is helping viewers improve their financial lives.⠀

__________________⠀

At the end of her first day as a summer intern at CNBC in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, Catherine Campo headed to the gym. She hopped on a treadmill, pressed start and then glanced up to see what was playing on the gym’s televisions. ⠀

Every single one was playing the episode of "Mad Money with Jim Cramer" she had finished taping just an hour before.⠀

“I couldn't believe it,” said Campo, who will be a junior at Brown this fall. “My hard work was right there, plastered on at least 15 televisions. It was so tangible. I had helped to make that show happen. I had helped to get it to these TV screens.”⠀

As a production intern, Campo’s primary role is to facilitate the show’s famous “lightning round” session, in which host Jim Cramer answers rapid-fire questions from viewers seeking advice on particular stocks. For each show — one airs every weekday — Campo has to find 12 viewers, call them to get more information and then book them.⠀

Before her “Mad Money” internship, Campo interned at the CNBC.com breaking news desk. But as a theatre arts and performance studies concentrator, she wanted to explore a career that was on screen, rather than online. ⠀

As an engaged scholar at Brown — a student whose coursework and senior capstone project address community challenges — “Mad Money” in particular interested her with its emphasis on educating viewers without deep financial expertise about how to better invest their money. The internship serves as one of her required practicums as an engaged scholar.⠀

While “Mad Money” isn’t a performance in the traditional sense, Campo says that it follows many of the conventions of theatre: there’s a script, a cast and crew, and a final show. And the main goal, she says, is to engage the audience, in this case so that they can learn something about finance.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #BrownSummerExperiences
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Advocating for women’s reproductive health⠀ ⠀ Decades apart, two women of Brown are kindred ...
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Advocating for women’s reproductive health⠀ ⠀ Decades apart, two women of Brown are kindred spirits in their quest for access to quality health care.⠀ __________________⠀ ⠀ Mimi Pichey ’72 came to Brown as an activist and has remained one ever since.⠀ ⠀ Her passion? Making sure ... Advocating for women’s reproductive health⠀

Decades apart, two women of Brown are kindred spirits in their quest for access to quality health care.⠀
__________________⠀

Mimi Pichey ’72 came to Brown as an activist and has remained one ever since.⠀

Her passion? Making sure women have access to safe, affordable and effective reproductive health care—something that is as critical today as it was when she was an undergraduate. As a student in the late 60's and early 70's, Pichey was acutely aware of how limited her and friends’ options were in seeking reproductive health services. “Typically, our choices were either expensive or substandard, if available at all,” says Pichey. “Or even dangerous, as in the case of illegal abortions.” As a result, Mimi found an opportunity to turn activism into impact by establishing an endowed fund to support the Women's Reproductive Health Fund.⠀

“Brown's Warren Alpert Medical School is at the forefront of schools in the country that sufficiently address issues surrounding abortion, contraception, adolescent pregnancy and parenting, and causes and consequences of infertility,” says Dr. Rebecca Allen, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology and associate professor of medical science. “This fund will advance medical training in women’s reproductive health for all students, as well as provide opportunities for the next generation of advocates, educators, and physician leaders working to advance safe and affordable health care for all women.”⠀

One of those opportunities is the Medical School’s Scholarly Concentration in Women's Reproductive Health. And one of those future leaders is Audrey Carr MD’19.⠀

As an undergraduate psychology concentrator at UMass Amherst, Carr was part of a neuroendocrine lab that studied how parts of the brain differed based on gender. She enjoyed the research, but felt she needed something more direct. “I like working with people,” she says, “and seeing how what you’re doing could change their lives.” After graduating, Carr landed an administrative job at Brigham and Women’s Hospital that ignited her interest in women's health.⠀

Continue reading at brunonia.brown.edu / #BrownTogether /
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Brown University meets 100% of every student's demonstrated financial need, a commitment that ensures that talented students from across the globe can join the Brown community, regardless of financial resources.⠀ ⠀ Through the Brown Promise initiative, the University has eliminated ... Brown University meets 100% of every student's demonstrated financial need, a commitment that ensures that talented students from across the globe can join the Brown community, regardless of financial resources.⠀

Through the Brown Promise initiative, the University has eliminated packaged loans from all undergraduate financial aid awards, so that financial considerations do not prevent admitted students from choosing Brown.⠀

(🔗 in bio) #BrownBecause ⠀

#BrownPromise #BrownTogether
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Summer rain on Thayer Street 🌧️ ⠀ <span class="emoji emoji1f4f7"></span>: @ashley.photo – add yours with #SceneatBrown
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Summer rain on Thayer Street 🌧️ ⠀ : @ashley.photo – add yours with #SceneatBrown Summer rain on Thayer Street 🌧️ ⠀
📷: @ashley.photo – add yours with #SceneatBrown
During this sun-soaked time of year, the “green roof” of the Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the ...
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During this sun-soaked time of year, the “green roof” of the Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts becomes a meadow alive with grasses and clovers. ⠀ ⠀ The plants helps to capture and filter rainwater, preventing storm water from entering local waterways. Sustainable ... During this sun-soaked time of year, the “green roof” of the Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts becomes a meadow alive with grasses and clovers. 🌱⠀

The plants helps to capture and filter rainwater, preventing storm water from entering local waterways. Sustainable features like louvered shades and this living rooftop enabled the Granoff Center to earn LEED gold certification, one of the highest ratings for building sustainability. #SceneatBrown #BrownUniversity
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Brown joins in legal brief supporting diversity in admissions⠀ ⠀ In support of Harvard University’s ...
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Brown joins in legal brief supporting diversity in admissions⠀ ⠀ In support of Harvard University’s admissions case, Brown and 15 other colleges and universities argued in a July 30 amicus brief that the federal courts should affirm the ability to consider race in admissions.⠀ ⠀ _________________⠀ ⠀ Brown ... Brown joins in legal brief supporting diversity in admissions⠀

In support of Harvard University’s admissions case, Brown and 15 other colleges and universities argued in a July 30 amicus brief that the federal courts should affirm the ability to consider race in admissions.⠀

_________________⠀

Brown University and 15 other colleges and universities jointly urged a U.S. District Court on Monday, July 30, to affirm the ability for higher education institutions to consider race as one factor in their admissions processes.⠀

The brief was filed in support of Harvard University, whose admissions practices are the subject of a 2014 lawsuit filed by Students for Fair Admissions. The suit challenges Harvard’s approach to admitting undergraduate students and alleges that the university holds prospective students who are Asian American to a higher standard than other applicants.⠀

In this week’s amicus brief, the universities emphasized the profound importance of a diverse student body to their educational missions.⠀

"We at Brown will do everything in our power to advocate against changes to laws or policies that would undermine our ability to build a diverse community of outstanding students," said Brown University President Christina Paxson. "Through our race-conscious admission practices, Brown assembles the diverse range of perspectives and experiences essential for a learning and research community that prepares students to thrive in a complex and changing world."⠀

The brief argued that individualized, holistic review of applications — with race and ethnicity considered as one factor among many — is the best means that universities can employ in pursuit of meaningful diversity.⠀

“The diversity that Amici seek in their admissions policies in nuanced and multifaceted, and it encompasses a diversity of perspectives, experiences, goals, backgrounds, races, ethnicities and interests...” the brief stated.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity
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Partners HealthCare, Care New England and Brown University negotiate partnership to strengthen ...
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Partners HealthCare, Care New England and Brown University negotiate partnership to strengthen health care⠀ ⠀ Partners-Care New England affiliation will support Brown-led academics and teaching and bring new economic development, research opportunities to Rhode Island.⠀ ⠀ _______________⠀ ⠀ Partners ... Partners HealthCare, Care New England and Brown University negotiate partnership to strengthen health care⠀

Partners-Care New England affiliation will support Brown-led academics and teaching and bring new economic development, research opportunities to Rhode Island.⠀

_______________⠀

Partners HealthCare, Care New England Health System and Brown University have signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to formalize a joint commitment to providing the highest quality of patient care, physician training and biomedical innovation to Rhode Island.⠀

The MOU signed by the three organizations follows the announcement in May of a definitive agreement formalizing Partners’ planned acquisition of CNE, and aligns the shared vision of all three organizations to benefit the communities of Rhode Island. It establishes Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School as the primary academic research and teaching institution of record for Partners-CNE in Rhode Island.⠀

The memorandum details the terms for negotiating a formal agreement in the coming weeks.⠀

“Today’s announcement represents an important step in this collaborative effort between our institutions and our collective commitment to strengthening the health care landscape in Rhode Island and for the advancement of academic training,” said Care New England President and CEO James E. Fanale, MD. “This signifies tremendous opportunity for research, the economy, and most importantly, for those who rely on us for the best possible care.”⠀

Brown has a longtime academic medical affiliation with CNE, which is home to Brown’s programs in obstetrics and gynecology and neonatology (at Women & Infants); in psychiatry (at Butler); and in family medicine (Kent).⠀

Following Partners’ proposed acquisition of CNE, the three partners are committed to deepening their collaboration through a clinical, medical education and biomedical research affiliation.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity ⠀
#RhodeIsland #RI #Healthcare
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Linguistic expertise key to improving Deaf health research⠀ ⠀ A new Brown-UMass collaboration ...
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Linguistic expertise key to improving Deaf health research⠀ ⠀ A new Brown-UMass collaboration leverages cultural and language expertise to help biomedical researchers work productively with the Deaf community and address low levels of health literacy.⠀ ⠀ _______________⠀ ⠀ For ... Linguistic expertise key to improving Deaf health research⠀

A new Brown-UMass collaboration leverages cultural and language expertise to help biomedical researchers work productively with the Deaf community and address low levels of health literacy.⠀

_______________⠀

For the past two years, Tim Riker, a lecturer of American Sign Language at Brown University’s Center for Language Studies, has worked with a group of University of Massachusetts Medical School researchers to tackle a significant problem: low levels of health literacy within the Deaf community, due in part to the disconnect between biomedical researchers and the Deaf population.⠀

The collaboration, led by Melissa L. Anderson, assistant professor of psychiatry at the UMass Medical School, integrates Riker’s cultural and linguistic expertise with the expertise of clinicians and researchers. A group of Deaf community advisors — laypersons from the Deaf community who advise on how best to meet the needs of their peers — rounds out the research team.⠀

“The objective is to understand the social, political and historical experience of Deaf people and to transform health research in order to improve population health,” Riker said.⠀

The team conducted focus groups and community forums with Deaf individuals to collect information on how hearing researchers can do a better job of including Deaf people in biomedical research, Anderson said. From there, they developed and tested a new research methodology, which they outlined in a recent commentary in the journal Qualitative Health Research.⠀

Cracking the code on effective qualitative research within the Deaf community could help address a range of health issues, Riker and Anderson said.⠀

“Mental illnesses, addiction and trauma within the Deaf community are higher than among the general population,” Riker said. “Rates of obesity, diabetes, suicide, domestic violence and sexual or intimate partner violence are also higher, along with other types of health disparities.”⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #AmericanSignLanguage #ASL
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Brown alumna ushers in a new era at the National Air and Space Museum⠀ ⠀ Ellen Stofan, a Brown alumna ...
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Brown alumna ushers in a new era at the National Air and Space Museum⠀ ⠀ Ellen Stofan, a Brown alumna and the first woman to lead the museum in Washington, D.C., says she plans to feature more women and people of color in future exhibits.⠀ ⠀ ________________⠀ ⠀ As a college sophomore, ... Brown alumna ushers in a new era at the National Air and Space Museum⠀

Ellen Stofan, a Brown alumna and the first woman to lead the museum in Washington, D.C., says she plans to feature more women and people of color in future exhibits.⠀

________________⠀

As a college sophomore, Ellen Stofan ’85 ScM, ’89 PhD, took an internship with the planetary research group of the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Now, decades later, she has returned to the institution — as its first-ever female director. ⠀

Stofan’s career is, in some ways, a family affair: Her father was an engineer at NASA, her mother an elementary school science teacher. “I just grew up around space and science,” she says. She saw her first rocket launch at age 4. At 14, while celebrating another launch, she attended a talk by astronomer Carl Sagan for the families of NASA scientists. By the end of his speech, she’d decided on her future career: She was going to be a planetary geologist.⠀

Arriving at Brown for graduate school after attending William & Mary, Stofan intended to study Mars. But her advisor, professor of geological sciences James W. Head, was focused on Venus. “I caught the bug from him,” she said. “I really enjoyed working on this planet that in some ways is so like the Earth, and in some ways so different.” The planet is nightmarishly hot but scientists believe it once had an ocean and an atmosphere much like our own.⠀

In the years since, her work has shifted between Venus, Mars, and Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. She’s held several senior scientist positions at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California; in 2013, she was tapped to serve as the organization’s chief scientist (the second Brown PhD to fill the position, after James Garvin ’78, ’81 ScM, ’84 PhD). During her three-year tenure, she served as a top advisor to the head of the space agency and helped craft a long-term plan to send humans to Mars.⠀


Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity #EverTrue @airandspacemuseum | @brownalumnimagazine | #NASA
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Summer at Brown 🌳<span class="emoji emoji1f43b"></span><span class="emoji emoji2600"></span>️⠀ <span class="emoji emoji1f4f7"></span>: @tamalpaismatt – add yours with #SceneatBrown⠀ #SummeratBrown | #BrownUniversity ...
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Summer at Brown 🌳️⠀ : @tamalpaismatt – add yours with #SceneatBrown⠀ #SummeratBrown | #BrownUniversity | #GoBruno | #EverTrue Summer at Brown 🌳🐻☀️⠀
📷: @tamalpaismatt – add yours with #SceneatBrown⠀
#SummeratBrown | #BrownUniversity | #GoBruno | #EverTrue
Sayles Hall glowing in the summer night <span class="emoji emoji1f4a1"></span><span class="emoji emoji1f30c"></span><span class="emoji emoji1f60d"></span>⠀ ⠀ <span class="emoji emoji1f4f7"></span>: @obiwanxie – add yours with #SceneatBrown ⠀ #PVD ...
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Sayles Hall glowing in the summer night ⠀ ⠀ : @obiwanxie – add yours with #SceneatBrown ⠀ #PVD | #Providence | #BrownUniversity Sayles Hall glowing in the summer night 💡🌌😍⠀

📷: @obiwanxie – add yours with #SceneatBrown ⠀
#PVD | #Providence | #BrownUniversity
Brown historian sheds light on forgotten papal history⠀ ⠀ In his new book "The Pope Who Would Be ...
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Brown historian sheds light on forgotten papal history⠀ ⠀ In his new book "The Pope Who Would Be King," Brown alumnus and social science professor David Kertzer details a major turning point in the history of the Catholic Church.⠀ ⠀ _____________⠀ ⠀ Pulitzer Prize winner David Kertzer ... Brown historian sheds light on forgotten papal history⠀

In his new book "The Pope Who Would Be King," Brown alumnus and social science professor David Kertzer details a major turning point in the history of the Catholic Church.⠀

_____________⠀

Pulitzer Prize winner David Kertzer ’69 is one of the Brown faculty’s best-selling authors. One of his 12 books has even caught the eye of director Steven Spielberg for adaptation. After receiving his PhD from Brandeis University, he taught at Bowdoin College until returning to Brown as an anthropology and history professor in 1992. He was provost from 2006 to 2011 and is the Paul Dupee Jr. University Professor of Social Science. His latest book, "The Pope Who Would Be King: The Exile of Pius IX and the Emergence of Modern Europe," was published by Random House in April.⠀

Q: Why have you focused so much of your writing on the history of the papacy?⠀

I began in this area — politics, religion, Italy, the church — through contemporary work as an anthropologist. But I’d always had historical interest. None of my work had directly focused on the Vatican until a friend of mine, a historian, mentioned this Jewish child, Edgardo Mortara in Bologna, who had been seized on orders of the Inquisition — and the Inquisition was headed by the pope [Pius IX] — on the grounds that he’d been secretly baptized by a Christian serving girl. The case of Mortara became an international cause, with Pius refusing to release him and raising him as his own. So I began [writing about papal history] with my 1997 book about that, "The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara." It’s recently gotten attention because Steven Spielberg announced he’s making a film based on it. Work on it has been delayed, but I hope it goes ahead.⠀

Continue reading at news.brown.edu (🔗 in bio) #BrownUniversity | @brownalumnimagazine
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At Brown University, who you are as an individual is valued and celebrated. At the same time, a shared appreciation for embracing differences and perspectives unites us. ⠀ ⠀ We are a place where students stay up late talking passionately about difficult social and political issues. They ... At Brown University, who you are as an individual is valued and celebrated. At the same time, a shared appreciation for embracing differences and perspectives unites us. ⠀

We are a place where students stay up late talking passionately about difficult social and political issues. They get excited about applied economics and Russian literature. They collaborate on innovative startups, performance art and social ventures. Here, you'll have a stimulating social life with peers who care deeply about their work and the world around them. ⠀

Busy, in a Good Way⠀
Many of our students think of Brown as an extended family. With hundreds of clubs to choose from — plus lectures, performances, exhibitions, concerts, readings, film screenings, and more — there's always something happening when you're ready to explore and connect. ⠀

A Spirit of Community⠀
From residential fraternities and sororities to Social Action House, Brown’s 20 housing communities give students myriad options to improve their Spanish or French proficiency, promote cultural exchange, or even join adrenaline-filled Nerf battles.⠀

NCAA Division I Sports⠀
We play at the highest level, with more than 900 athletes across 38 varsity teams. Our female athletes compete in 20 sports, representing the nation’s largest collegiate athletic program for women. Go Bruno! ⠀

(🔗 in bio) #BrownBecause
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