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Glenn astronaut ohio

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John Herschel Glenn, Jr. was born on July 18, 1921, in Cambridge, Ohio. Glenn graduated high school ...
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John Herschel Glenn, Jr. was born on July 18, 1921, in Cambridge, Ohio. Glenn graduated high school in 1939, and went on to he study Engineering at Muskingum College. He earned a private pilot license for credit in a physics course in 1941. When the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor brought the ... John Herschel Glenn, Jr. was born on July 18, 1921, in Cambridge, Ohio. Glenn graduated high school in 1939, and went on to he study Engineering at Muskingum College. He earned a private pilot license for credit in a physics course in 1941. When the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor brought the United States into World War II, Glenn quit college to enlist in the U.S. Army Air Corps. However, he was never called to duty, and in March 1942 enlisted as a United States Navy aviation cadet. During his advanced training at the Navy Air Station in Corpus Christi, he was offered the chance to transfer to the U.S. Marine Corps and took it. Upon completing his training in 1943, he would become an F4U Corsair fighter pilot, and flew 59 combat missions in the South Pacific and was promoted to captain shortly before the end of World War II. When the Korean war started Glenn was was assigned the new F9F Panther jet interceptor. He flew his Panther in 63 combat missions, gaining the nickname "magnet ass" from his alleged ability to attract enemy flak. He flew with Marine reservist Ted Williams, a future Hall of Fame baseball player for the Boston Red Sox, as his wingman. For his service in 149 combat missions in two wars, he received numerous honors, including the Distinguished Flying Cross (6 times), the nations second highest award for valor. However, it would be his feat as a United States Astronaut that would make him a household name. On February 20, 1962 Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth, aboard his ship Friendship 7, circling the globe three times during a flight lasting nearly five hours. This made Glenn the third American in space and the fifth human being in space. Much more can be said about this great American, he never stopped serving his nation and would go on to serve as a U.S. Senator. His life would make it to Hollywood in the 1983 movie, "The Right Stuff." On Dec 8, 2016, John Glenn passed away at the age of 95. Thank you for everything you have done to make our country great! A true American Icon. #hero #soldier #american #icon #johnglenn #usa #nasa #marine #pilot #us #navy #aviation #ohio #warrior #astronaut #dog_robber
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From @history On #ThisDayinHistory 1959, NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration ...
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From @history On #ThisDayinHistory 1959, NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration introduces America’s first astronauts to the press: Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper Jr., John H. Glenn Jr., Virgil “Gus” Grissom, Walter Schirra Jr., Alan Shepard Jr., and Donald Slayton. ... From @history On #ThisDayinHistory 1959, NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration introduces America’s first astronauts to the press: Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper Jr., John H. Glenn Jr., Virgil “Gus” Grissom, Walter Schirra Jr., Alan Shepard Jr., and Donald Slayton. The seven men, all military test pilots, were carefully selected from a group of 32 candidates to take part in Project Mercury, America’s first manned space program. The astronaut selection process began with 110 candidates who were whittled down to 32. The final 32 candidates underwent exhaustive medical and psychological examinations then traveled to the Wright Aeromedical Laboratory in Dayton, Ohio, where they underwent the most grueling part of the selection process. For six days and three nights, the men were subjected to tests of their tolerance of physical and psychological stress. Among other tests, the candidates were forced to spend an hour in a pressure chamber that simulated an altitude of 65,000 feet, and two hours in a chamber that was heated to 130°F (54°C). At the end of one week, 18 candidates remained and the selection committee was to choose six based on interviews. But, seven candidates were so strong they ended up settling on that number. After they were announced, the “Mercury Seven” became overnight celebrities. On May 5, astronaut Alan Shepard was successfully launched into space on a suborbital flight and in February 1962, John Glenn became the first American to orbit Earth.
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On #ThisDayinHistory 1959, @NASA introduces America’s first astronauts to the press: Scott Carpenter, ...
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On #ThisDayinHistory 1959, @NASA introduces America’s first astronauts to the press: Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper Jr., John H. Glenn Jr., Virgil “Gus” Grissom, Walter Schirra Jr., Alan Shepard Jr., and Donald Slayton. The seven men, all military test pilots, were carefully selected ... On #ThisDayinHistory 1959, @NASA introduces America’s first astronauts to the press: Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper Jr., John H. Glenn Jr., Virgil “Gus” Grissom, Walter Schirra Jr., Alan Shepard Jr., and Donald Slayton. The seven men, all military test pilots, were carefully selected from a group of 32 candidates to take part in Project Mercury, America’s first manned space program. NASA planned to begin manned orbital flights in 1961. On October 4, 1957, the USSR scored the first victory in the “space race” when it successfully launched the world’s 1st artificial satellite, Sputnik. In response, the U.S. consolidated its efforts into NASA and in January 1959, the astronaut selection process began with 110 candidates. An initial battery of written tests, interviews, and medical history reviews further reduced that number 36. After learning of the extreme physical and mental tests planned for them, four men dropped out. The final 32 candidates underwent exhaustive medical and psychological examinations. The men proved so healthy, however, that only one candidate was eliminated. The remaining 31 candidates then traveled to the Wright Aeromedical Laboratory in Dayton, Ohio, where they underwent the most grueling part of the selection process. For six days and three nights, the men were subjected to tests of their tolerance of physical and psychological stress. Among other tests, the candidates were forced to spend an hour in a pressure chamber that simulated an altitude of 65,000 feet, and two hours in a chamber that was heated to 130°F (54°C). At the end of one week, 18 candidates remained and the selection committee was to choose six based on interviews. But, seven candidates were so strong they ended up settling on that number. After they were announced, the “Mercury Seven” became overnight celebrities. On May 5, astronaut Alan Shepard was successfully launched into space on a suborbital flight and in February 1962, John Glenn became the first American to orbit Earth. NASA continued to trail the Soviets in space achievements until NASA’s Apollo program put the first men on the moon. #NASA #Spacerace #history #mercury7
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In 1968, a young black man arrived at the NASA Lewis campus for a job as an aerospace mechanic apprentice. ...
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In 1968, a young black man arrived at the NASA Lewis campus for a job as an aerospace mechanic apprentice. It wasn’t easy. 1968 was a time of civil unrest in our country with the deaths of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy. And as one of only a few African American employees, Mack Thomas ... In 1968, a young black man arrived at the NASA Lewis campus for a job as an aerospace mechanic apprentice. It wasn’t easy. 1968 was a time of civil unrest in our country with the deaths of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy. And as one of only a few African American employees, Mack Thomas was part of a new cultural shift.
In his neighborhood, Thomas was a rock star. “Everybody thought I was an astronaut, even though I told them no,” he chuckles. “It was an incredible time to be at NASA. We were all pushing to get us to the Moon.”
This year Thomas celebrated his 50th anniversary at the center. He’s worked in just about every building—in wind tunnels, test cells, laboratories. Now he is an outreach specialist, the job of his dreams. “I love interacting with the public and trying to inspire younger folks to pursue their dreams of working for NASA,” he says. “That’s where my heart is.”
We salute Thomas as we begin a "diamond edition" of our Faces of Glenn series celebrating NASA's 60th anniversary. Join us to honor some of our longest serving employees over the next four Thursdays.

#NASA, #NASAglenn, #FacesofGlenn, #diamondedition, #photography, #behindthescenes, #workforce, #Cleveland, #Ohio, #civilrights, #NASAPeople, #HumansofNASA, #NASAProud, #1968, #NASA60th, #salute
Photo credit: NASA/ Rami Daud
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