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Erincaity

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erincaity

Erin Ashford

Followers: 1,449
Following: 1,620
Media: 871
We opened a biscuit shop y’all! @littleolasbiscuits
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We opened a biscuit shop y’all! @littleolasbiscuits
Black Lives Matter
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Black Lives Matter
So many things I want to say and shout from a rooftop about this classic Italian cocktail. Firstly, ...
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So many things I want to say and shout from a rooftop about this classic Italian cocktail. Firstly, it was created in 1919, in part thanks to Count Camillo Negroni who wanted gin instead of soda in his Americano cocktail. Secondly, this is a drink that has many variations today (different spirits in place of gin, white negronis, the less bitter spirit Aperol instead of Campari), but a good solid classic can never be beat, so let’s make one! Tools: 1. Mixing glass 2. Measuring tool 3. Barspoon 4. Julep or Hawthorne strainer 5. Y-peeler Ingredients: 1. Gin (I love a London dry gin, like Beefeater, since it reads very clean and dry in a Negroni, but choose your favorite!) 2. Sweet vermouth (Cocchi di Torino is my preference since it’s light, bright cherry and not too bitter which helps reign in the Campari.) *Don’t forget to refrigerate your vermouth. 3. Campari (you can’t have a classic Negroni without Campari y’all.) 4. Orange peel Recipe: 1. Equal parts (which is why this cocktail is so fun and easy to make) 1 oz each of gin, sweet vermouth and Campari. 2. Combine these ingredients into your mixing glass, and fill with ice. *Stir until chilled. 3. Using your strainer, strain over one large 2x2 ice cube in a rocks/old fashioned glass. 4. Garnish with an orange peel, using your Y-peeler (not too much pith). Make sure to zest heavily so you get all of the fresh orange aromas and oils. I really believe the most important part of a Negroni is dilution. *When stirring this cocktail, remember that this drink is all booze (no citrus) and it’s very viscous, so it needs to be properly diluted and then some. No one wants a syrupy or unbalanced drink. The colder/dense ice is always best for stirring, but sometimes not always an option at home, so beware of ice chips and find the best pieces you can. I really like stirring it first and pouring over a large cube because then your drink is perfectly diluted and won’t melt too fast as you sip and savor it. If you don’t have large ice cubes, no problem, just remember to add more ice after stirring your drink to top it off. If you’re looking for more tips, I’ll post some extra “Negroni Rules” in my stories.
The Kentucky Derby is America’s oldest continuously held major sporting event (since 1875). The ...
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The Kentucky Derby is America’s oldest continuously held major sporting event (since 1875). The most exciting two minutes in sports takes place at Churchill Downs in Louisville, KY. The event today is now synonymous with big hats, close calls and Mint Juleps! Once made with brandy or rum and used for medicinal purposes, this classic cocktail became the official drink of Derby (in 1938), and now Kentucky bourbon is the star. The Derby has been postponed this year and will be held in September, but May is still the perfect time to drink a julep. So let’s do it! Tools needed: 1. Muddler (could also use the end of a wooden spoon) 2. Measuring tool Ingredients needed: 1. Mint (6-8 leaves to muddle, as well as a sprig for garnish 2. Simple syrup (1:1 white sugar syrup) 3. Your favorite Kentucky bourbon Recipe: 1. In your julep cup (should be a silver tin, or pewter if you’re fancy!) combine 6-8 mint leaves and 3/4 oz white sugar simple syrup 1:1. 2. Muddle mint with the syrup, making sure to gentle press the leaves, releasing their aromatics. (Don’t smash or hammer the mint, over muddled or “broken” mint leaves can create a bitter taste. Also, it’s just not necessary to be heavy handed with it). 3. Add 2 oz of your favorite Kentucky bourbon (Old Forester is classic). 4. Fill the cup with crushed or pellet ice. If you do not have crushed ice you can make your own with a Lewis Bag (small burlap bag that you can smash or crush ice in). If you do not have a Lewis bag, I often use a canvas grocery tote. Use your muddler as a mallet. It also helps to use a bar spoon and do a quick squizzle to incorporate all of the ingredients together, make sure the mint stays at the bottom of the glass and top with more ice. 5. Garnish with a mint sprig (the bigger the better) and a short metal straw. A Mint Julep is like a bourbon slushie, and it’s southern as can be, honey. The crushed ice makes the cup frosty cold. The bourbon shines through, making it spirit forward but is balanced by the refreshing menthol from the mint and sugar.
The Daiquiri is a cocktail that originated in Cuba and was created by an American mining engineer ...
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The Daiquiri is a cocktail that originated in Cuba and was created by an American mining engineer who was living in Santiago de Cuba and named the drink after the beach, located near a coastal mining town. Becoming Cuba’s most popular drink, it quickly spread around the world in the 1920’s because of thirsty Prohibition drinkers and Daiquiri enthusiasts like Hemingway and JFK. Sometimes the most simple drinks to make are the most highly debated amongst bartenders, and the Daiquiri falls into that category. This 3 ingredient cocktail (rum, lime, sugar) can be altered by the style of rum, the type of sugar and it’s presentation. If you were to choose a more robust over proof Jamaican rum (which carries a lot of heat and baking spices) perhaps you should use a Demerara sugar to balance instead of a white sugar. If you’re using a funky Agricole Rhum (a style of rum made with fresh sugar cane, not molasses) maybe you want to change your ratios to adhere to that Rhums ability to take over the drink. The same goes for sugar. Are you making a 2:1 syrup or a 1:1. Are you using cane sugar or Demerara. So maybe the simplest drinks take the most skill and care to produce balanced cocktails. A classic daiquiri should be a teeter totter of sugar and acid, with it teetering more on the sour side since it is technically a “rum sour”. Most importantly, a Daiquiri should be clean and easy to drink. For example, for some time the Daiquiri became a “bartenders handshake” and was put in place to shoot a Daiquiri rather than savor it, a “Snaquiri”. When it’s made right, there’s no time to waste. Tools needed: 1. Shaker tin 2. Hawthorne strainer 3. Mesh strainer 4. Measuring tool 5. Hand juicer Ingredients Needed: 1. Juice of 1 lime 2. Simple syrup (1:1) 3. Your favorite rum Recipe: 1. In your shaker tin, add 3/4 oz lime juice, 3/4 oz simple syrup (1:1) and 2 oz rum. 2. Fill your shaker tin halfway full of ice. 3. Shake for 15 strong shakes, breaking down the ice and diluting the cocktail. 4. Strain your cocktail using the Hawthorne strainer over your shaker tin and the mesh strainer over your coupe glass, catching any small pieces of ice. 5. Garnish with a lime wheel.
“Crooked Piece of Time” Bertoux brandy 1 1/2 oz Diplomático Mantuano 1/2 oz Cointreau 1/2 oz Grapefruit ...
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“Crooked Piece of Time” Bertoux brandy 1 1/2 oz Diplomático Mantuano 1/2 oz Cointreau 1/2 oz Grapefruit juice 3/4 oz Lime juice 1/4 oz *Demerara 2:1 syrup 1/4 oz Angostura bitters 3 dashes . Combine all ingredients in your shaker tin and shake until chilled. Strain into an ice filled Collins glass. Garnish with a straw, mint sprig and grapefruit peel. *In a small pot, combine 2 parts Demerara sugar with 1 part hot water. Stir until sugar is dissolved. Let cool and store in your refrigerator. . My home bar has grown a bit in the past few weeks. Allowing me to make more ingredient heavy drinks, like this tiki ode to the late John Prine. A Sidecar variation gone awry as I realized I was out of lemons. These days I’m focused on slowing down and going with the flow. Don’t put too much pressure on yourself, it’s okay to take a breath and turn your music way up.
The Manhattan is a whiskey based classic cocktail created in the 1870, in New York. Like so many classics, ...
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The Manhattan is a whiskey based classic cocktail created in the 1870, in New York. Like so many classics, its origin story has somewhat been lost, since during that time not many recipes were being chronicled. What we do know is that the original cocktail, which was created in its namesake borough, is only slightly different from what we know today. Sometimes wavering in quality of ingredients but never disappearing from drinkers minds and bars menus, proving this classic is one of the greats. A strong, spirit forward drink easy to make at home for your virtual happy hours or post dinner night caps. Tools needed: 1. Mixing glass 2. Bar spoon 3. Measuring tool 4. Hawthorne or Julep strainer Ingredients: 1. Whiskey 2. Sweet Vermouth 3. Angostura bitters 4. Luxardo cherry (or Toschi) Recipe: 1. Combine 4-6 dashes of Angostura bitters, 1 oz sweet vermouth and 2 oz whiskey in your mixing glass. Stir ingredients until chilled. 2. Strain cocktail into a coupe glass or any cute glass that is “up”. 3. Garnish with a cherry. If you don’t have cherries (or if you already ate all of them!) no problem, skip the garnish. The whiskey you choose (bourbon or rye) will dictate a lot of the cocktails flavor profile. Bourbon will lend way to more vanilla or oak notes with rye adding more spice and citrus. The same can be said for the sweet vermouth. The brand you pick will design the profile, so there’s no wrong choice, just preference. I prefer Cocchi di Torino as an all purpose sweet vermouth since it is lighter and has more bright cherry notes rather than its more robust competitor Carpano Antica which carries more dark chocolate notes. The simple build on this cocktail lends way to so many different variations. It’s a real opportunity to “mix and match” ingredients, with the matching (balance!) of ingredients being the most important part. Swap the whiskey and Angostura bitters to try Mezcal and orange bitters instead. Take away the vermouth and try an Amaro in its place (see: Black Manhattan). Split the sweet vermouth with half dry vermouth (see: Perfect Manhattan). Garnish with an orange peel for some added citrus to lighten it up.
The Margarita is one of the few tequila based classic cocktails and is now one of the most popular ...
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The Margarita is one of the few tequila based classic cocktails and is now one of the most popular mixed drinks in America. Who created it and where it came from is still debatable, but it’s said that the drink itself was based on the Daisy, a pre-prohibition cocktail made with brandy, yellow chartreuse and lemon juice. Tequila was added to a Daisy in place of brandy in the late 1930s in Mexico and California. The Margarita is a 3-ingredient cocktail, so let’s keep it simple with this recipe. Tools needed: 1. Shaker tin 2. Hawthorne strainer 3. Measuring tool 4. Hand juicer Ingredients: 1. Juice of 1 lime 2. Orange liqueur 3. Your favorite tequila Recipe: 1. In your shaker tin, building from smallest ingredient first, add 3/4 oz lime juice, 1 oz orange liqueur and 2 oz tequila. 2. Fill your shaker tin halfway full of ice. 3. Shake for 10-15 strong shakes in a back and forth motion, breaking down the ice and diluting the cocktail. (You will notice the shaker tin gets cold and icey on the outside and that’s an indicator that your cocktail is diluted). 4. Strain your cocktail over an ice filled rocks glass. (If you prefer salt, swipe a lime on half of the rim of the glass and gently dip into a plate of salt before filling it with your finished cocktail). The type of tequila and orange liqueur you choose will change how the margarita will drink. A Blanco tequila will drink cleaner and grassier where as a Reposado will have more oak and caramel flavors. An orange liqueur (curaçao) like Grand Marnier or a Triple sec like Cointreau will also create different tastings margaritas, with orange liqueur carrying more weight and texture and triple sec being brighter and lighter. There is no right or wrong here, just all depends on your preference and what type of margarita you want! Once you have this classic build down, you can venture off into trying different tequila’s (or mezcal!), fruit liqueurs, flavored juices, or you can make a pitcher of frozen margs & waste away listening to Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville.
“Fairweather Friends with Benefits” @fairweathercider Smell the Van Cider, @revolutionspirits ...
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“Fairweather Friends with Benefits” @fairweathercider Smell the Van Cider, @revolutionspirits Amico Amaro, @stgeorgespirits Basil brandy, sparkling rosé / for the month of March come enjoy this cider based, low ABV porch crusher featuring some cider from our Cidery friends and some Amaro from our Amari friends!
Send No Flowers: rhum agricole, Jamaican rum, Cardamaro, PX sherry, Velvet Falernum, orgeat, ...
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Send No Flowers: rhum agricole, Jamaican rum, Cardamaro, PX sherry, Velvet Falernum, orgeat, lime, Burlesque bitters / a true example of two heads are better than one, this Mai Tai riff is @sophia_goons punk rock (bad) brain child, and it’s truly one of the best cocktails I’ve ever had the joy of putting on a menu. 🌴
Waltz Across Texas: @balconesdistilling rye, @laphroaig, nocino, @averna / Black Manhattan ...
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Waltz Across Texas: @balconesdistilling rye, @laphroaig, nocino, @averna / Black Manhattan riff with all the deep brooding notes of winter along with the complex charm of a Texas whiskey.
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